skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes

Abstract

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889979
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-219767
TRN: US200620%%182
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: AICHE 2006 Spring National Meeting, Orlando, FL, United States, Mar 23 - Mar 27, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CHIMNEYS; COMBUSTION; EXPLOSIVE FRACTURING; IN-SITU RETORTING; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; LIQUID FUELS; MINING; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; OIL SHALES; PETROLEUM; PROCESSING; RETORTING

Citation Formats

Burnham, A K, and McConaghy, J R. Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Burnham, A K, & McConaghy, J R. Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes. United States.
Burnham, A K, and McConaghy, J R. Sat . "Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889979.
@article{osti_889979,
title = {Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes},
author = {Burnham, A K and McConaghy, J R},
abstractNote = {While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: