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Title: Niobium Oxide Film Deposition Using a High-Density Plasma Source

Abstract

Niobium oxide was deposited reactively using a new type of high-density plasma sputter source. The plasma beam used for sputtering is generated remotely and its path to the target defined by the orthogonal locations of two electromagnets: one at the orifice of the plasma tube and the other just beneath the target plane. To accommodate very large batches of substrates, the trade-off between load capacity and deposition rates was evaluated. The effect on deposition rate was determined by moving the plasma source away from the target in one direction and by moving the target assembly away in an orthogonal direction. A simple methodology was used to reestablish the reactive deposition rate and oxide quality even when large changes were made to the chamber geometry. Deposition parameters were established to produce nonabsorbing niobium oxide films of about 100- and 350-nm thicknesses. The quality of the niobium oxide films was studied spectroscopically, ellipsometrically, and stoichiometrically.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889964
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-219431
TRN: US200620%%169
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 49th Annual SVC Technical Conference, Washington, DC, United States, Apr 22 - Apr 27, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; CAPACITY; DEPOSITION; ELECTROMAGNETS; GEOMETRY; NIOBIUM OXIDES; ORIFICES; OXIDES; PLASMA; SPUTTERING; SUBSTRATES; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Chow, R, Schmidt, M, Coombs, A, Anguita, J, and Thwaites, M. Niobium Oxide Film Deposition Using a High-Density Plasma Source. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Chow, R, Schmidt, M, Coombs, A, Anguita, J, & Thwaites, M. Niobium Oxide Film Deposition Using a High-Density Plasma Source. United States.
Chow, R, Schmidt, M, Coombs, A, Anguita, J, and Thwaites, M. Fri . "Niobium Oxide Film Deposition Using a High-Density Plasma Source". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889964.
@article{osti_889964,
title = {Niobium Oxide Film Deposition Using a High-Density Plasma Source},
author = {Chow, R and Schmidt, M and Coombs, A and Anguita, J and Thwaites, M},
abstractNote = {Niobium oxide was deposited reactively using a new type of high-density plasma sputter source. The plasma beam used for sputtering is generated remotely and its path to the target defined by the orthogonal locations of two electromagnets: one at the orifice of the plasma tube and the other just beneath the target plane. To accommodate very large batches of substrates, the trade-off between load capacity and deposition rates was evaluated. The effect on deposition rate was determined by moving the plasma source away from the target in one direction and by moving the target assembly away in an orthogonal direction. A simple methodology was used to reestablish the reactive deposition rate and oxide quality even when large changes were made to the chamber geometry. Deposition parameters were established to produce nonabsorbing niobium oxide films of about 100- and 350-nm thicknesses. The quality of the niobium oxide films was studied spectroscopically, ellipsometrically, and stoichiometrically.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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