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Title: Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae

Abstract

We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration GrantHST-HF-01158.01-A and Contract NAS 5-26555, National Science FoundationAward AST-0401479
OSTI Identifier:
889627
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59881
Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X; ASJOAB; R&D Project: 43CX01; BnR: 400409900; TRN: US0700852
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 645; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 07/10/2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; BRIGHTNESS; PHOTOMETRY; SPECTROSCOPY; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; VELOCITY; cosmology supernovae

Citation Formats

Nugent, Peter, Sullivan, Mark, Ellis, Richard, Gal-Yam, Avishay, Leonard, Douglas C., Howell, D. Andrew, Astier, Pierre, Carlberg, RaymondG., Conley, Alex, Fabbro, Sebastien, Fouchez, Dominique, Neill, James D., Pain, Reynald, Perrett, Kathy, Pritchet, Chris J, and Regnault, Nicolas. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1086/504413.
Nugent, Peter, Sullivan, Mark, Ellis, Richard, Gal-Yam, Avishay, Leonard, Douglas C., Howell, D. Andrew, Astier, Pierre, Carlberg, RaymondG., Conley, Alex, Fabbro, Sebastien, Fouchez, Dominique, Neill, James D., Pain, Reynald, Perrett, Kathy, Pritchet, Chris J, & Regnault, Nicolas. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae. United States. doi:10.1086/504413.
Nugent, Peter, Sullivan, Mark, Ellis, Richard, Gal-Yam, Avishay, Leonard, Douglas C., Howell, D. Andrew, Astier, Pierre, Carlberg, RaymondG., Conley, Alex, Fabbro, Sebastien, Fouchez, Dominique, Neill, James D., Pain, Reynald, Perrett, Kathy, Pritchet, Chris J, and Regnault, Nicolas. Mon . "Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae". United States. doi:10.1086/504413. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889627.
@article{osti_889627,
title = {Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae},
author = {Nugent, Peter and Sullivan, Mark and Ellis, Richard and Gal-Yam, Avishay and Leonard, Douglas C. and Howell, D. Andrew and Astier, Pierre and Carlberg, RaymondG. and Conley, Alex and Fabbro, Sebastien and Fouchez, Dominique and Neill, James D. and Pain, Reynald and Perrett, Kathy and Pritchet, Chris J and Regnault, Nicolas},
abstractNote = {We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.},
doi = {10.1086/504413},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 645,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift 'desert' between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. Within the framework of the MLCS2K2 light-curve fitting method, we use the SDSS-II SN sample to infer the mean reddening parameter for host galaxies, R{sub V} = 2.18 {+-} 0.14{sub stat} {+-} 0.48{sub syst}, and find that the intrinsic distribution of host-galaxy extinction is well fitted by an exponential function,more » P(A{sub V} ) = exp(-A{sub V} /{tau}{sub V}), with {tau}{sub V} = 0.334 {+-} 0.088 mag. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and a compilation of Nearby SN Ia measurements. A new feature in our analysis is the use of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of all surveys to account for selection biases, including those from spectroscopic targeting. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and {omega}{sub M}, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. We also consider constraints upon {omega}{sub M} and {omega}{sub {lambda}} for a cosmological constant model ({lambda}CDM) with w = -1 and non-zero spatial curvature. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst), {omega}{sub M} = 0.307 {+-} 0.019(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst) using MLCS2K2 and w = -0.96 {+-} 0.06(stat) {+-} 0.12(syst), {omega}{sub M} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016(stat) {+-} 0.025(syst) using the SALT-II fitter. We trace the discrepancy between these results to a difference in the rest-frame UV model combined with a different luminosity correction from color variations; these differences mostly affect the distance estimates for the SNLS and HST SNe. We present detailed discussions of systematic errors for both light-curve methods and find that they both show data-model discrepancies in rest-frame U band. For the SALT-II approach, we also see strong evidence for redshift-dependence of the color-luminosity parameter ({beta}). Restricting the analysis to the 136 SNe Ia in the Nearby+SDSS-II samples, we find much better agreement between the two analysis methods but with larger uncertainties: w = -0.92 {+-} 0.13(stat){sup +0.10} {sub -0.33}(syst) for MLCS2K2 and w = -0.92 {+-} 0.11(stat){sup +0.07} {sub -0.15} (syst) for SALT-II.« less
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