skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

Abstract

The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or inmore » one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889413
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-6908
TRN: US200619%%475
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; MASS SPECTROMETERS; DESIGN; ION MOBILITY; DETECTION; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES; CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS; HYBRID SYSTEMS; Explosives-Detection.; Chemical explosives-Detonation.; Ion mobility spectroscopy.

Citation Formats

Hunka Deborah Elaine, and Austin, Daniel E. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/889413.
Hunka Deborah Elaine, & Austin, Daniel E. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).. United States. doi:10.2172/889413.
Hunka Deborah Elaine, and Austin, Daniel E. Fri . "Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).". United States. doi:10.2172/889413. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889413.
@article{osti_889413,
title = {Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).},
author = {Hunka Deborah Elaine and Austin, Daniel E.},
abstractNote = {The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.},
doi = {10.2172/889413},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {7}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: