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Title: NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).

Abstract

In 2005, the NSLS proved itself, once again, to be a center of scientific excellence. This remarkable facility, commissioned in the early 1980s, is still attracting some of the world's best researchers in almost every scientific field, who produce more than seven hundred scientific papers every year using the NSLS. The 'Science Highlights' and 'Feature Highlights' sections of this report are just a small sampling of the many, many impressive research projects conducted at the NSLS in 2005. For example, a user group synthesized and studied zinc-oxide nanowires, which have applications in many optical and electrical devices. Another user group studied how strontium and uranium are removed from high-level radioactive waste. And in another interesting study, users deciphered the basis for antibiotic resistance. However, as always, the success of these projects depends on the performance of the facility. Again this year, the rings were in top form--reliability was 96 percent for the x-ray ring and 99 percent for the VUV-IR ring. Additionally, to keep the NSLS as productive as possible and to continue to attract users, many beamline upgrade projects were completed this year. One of the highlights of these upgrades is the new mini-gap undulator installed at beamline X25.more » This insertion device is providing a much brighter x-ray source for the program at X25. In the always important area of safety, several noteworthy activities took place this year. In particular, NSLS staff made a major commitment to labeling and inspecting electrical equipment. And perhaps the best news is what didn't happen--there were no reportable occurrences related to environmental, safety, or health issues in 2005, and no injuries that resulted in restricted or lost time. We all owe thanks to the dedicated NSLS staff and users who have ensured that the NSLS remains a reliable, safe, up-to-date research facility. As 2005 came to an end, I stepped down as NSLS Chairman in order to focus my primary efforts on NSLS-II, the world-leading third-generation synchrotron planned for construction at BNL. NSLS-II passed a critical milestone in 2005 with the approval by the Department of Energy of CD-0. BNL has established the NSLS-II Project Organization within the Light Sources Directorate to put in place the management systems and infrastructure necessary to execute this complex undertaking. I will serve as NSLS-II Project Director and also retain my position as Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, with the NSLS reporting to me. Another exciting development is the planned establishment of the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). JPSI will be devoted to cultivating and fostering collaborative, interdisciplinary R&D in areas of the physical sciences, engineering, and the life sciences that are united in employing synchrotron-based methods. JPSI will also develop new methods and applications that exploit the unique capabilities of NSLS-II and will serve as a gateway for NSLS-II users. JPSI will be a partnership between the Department of Energy and New York State, and I am delighted that New York State Governor George Pataki has pledged $30 million for the construction of the JPSI building. The building will be located adjacent to NSLS-II and will contain offices, meeting rooms, and specialized laboratories. The operating expenses of JPSI and funding for its research programs will be provided by the federal government. Until a permanent NSLS Director is selected, NSLS User Science Division Associate Chair Chi-Chang Kao will serve as the Interim NSLS Director. I couldn't be leaving the facility in more capable hands. Chi-Chang will lead NSLS staff and users this year in the development of a five-year strategic plan for the NSLS, scheduled for completion by the end of summer 2006. The plan will outline the course for the future operation and development of the NSLS, and will help ensure that the future of the NSLS remains as bright as its past.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (EDITOR)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
889286
Report Number(s):
BNL-75555-2005
R&D Project: LS-1; KC0204011; TRN: US0805998
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; A CENTERS; ANTIBIOTICS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; INJURIES; LIGHT SOURCES; NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; PHOTONS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SAFETY; SAMPLING; STRONTIUM; SYNCHROTRONS; URANIUM; WIGGLER MAGNETS; X-RAY SOURCES; SYNCHROTORN LIGHT SOURCE; ACTIVITY REPORT; NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE; UC-400; 401; 403

Citation Formats

MILLER, L. NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/889286.
MILLER, L. NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).. United States. doi:10.2172/889286.
MILLER, L. Mon . "NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).". United States. doi:10.2172/889286. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889286.
@article{osti_889286,
title = {NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005).},
author = {MILLER, L.},
abstractNote = {In 2005, the NSLS proved itself, once again, to be a center of scientific excellence. This remarkable facility, commissioned in the early 1980s, is still attracting some of the world's best researchers in almost every scientific field, who produce more than seven hundred scientific papers every year using the NSLS. The 'Science Highlights' and 'Feature Highlights' sections of this report are just a small sampling of the many, many impressive research projects conducted at the NSLS in 2005. For example, a user group synthesized and studied zinc-oxide nanowires, which have applications in many optical and electrical devices. Another user group studied how strontium and uranium are removed from high-level radioactive waste. And in another interesting study, users deciphered the basis for antibiotic resistance. However, as always, the success of these projects depends on the performance of the facility. Again this year, the rings were in top form--reliability was 96 percent for the x-ray ring and 99 percent for the VUV-IR ring. Additionally, to keep the NSLS as productive as possible and to continue to attract users, many beamline upgrade projects were completed this year. One of the highlights of these upgrades is the new mini-gap undulator installed at beamline X25. This insertion device is providing a much brighter x-ray source for the program at X25. In the always important area of safety, several noteworthy activities took place this year. In particular, NSLS staff made a major commitment to labeling and inspecting electrical equipment. And perhaps the best news is what didn't happen--there were no reportable occurrences related to environmental, safety, or health issues in 2005, and no injuries that resulted in restricted or lost time. We all owe thanks to the dedicated NSLS staff and users who have ensured that the NSLS remains a reliable, safe, up-to-date research facility. As 2005 came to an end, I stepped down as NSLS Chairman in order to focus my primary efforts on NSLS-II, the world-leading third-generation synchrotron planned for construction at BNL. NSLS-II passed a critical milestone in 2005 with the approval by the Department of Energy of CD-0. BNL has established the NSLS-II Project Organization within the Light Sources Directorate to put in place the management systems and infrastructure necessary to execute this complex undertaking. I will serve as NSLS-II Project Director and also retain my position as Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, with the NSLS reporting to me. Another exciting development is the planned establishment of the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). JPSI will be devoted to cultivating and fostering collaborative, interdisciplinary R&D in areas of the physical sciences, engineering, and the life sciences that are united in employing synchrotron-based methods. JPSI will also develop new methods and applications that exploit the unique capabilities of NSLS-II and will serve as a gateway for NSLS-II users. JPSI will be a partnership between the Department of Energy and New York State, and I am delighted that New York State Governor George Pataki has pledged $30 million for the construction of the JPSI building. The building will be located adjacent to NSLS-II and will contain offices, meeting rooms, and specialized laboratories. The operating expenses of JPSI and funding for its research programs will be provided by the federal government. Until a permanent NSLS Director is selected, NSLS User Science Division Associate Chair Chi-Chang Kao will serve as the Interim NSLS Director. I couldn't be leaving the facility in more capable hands. Chi-Chang will lead NSLS staff and users this year in the development of a five-year strategic plan for the NSLS, scheduled for completion by the end of summer 2006. The plan will outline the course for the future operation and development of the NSLS, and will help ensure that the future of the NSLS remains as bright as its past.},
doi = {10.2172/889286},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Departmentmore » of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.« less
  • The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materialsmore » Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.« less
  • The year 2002 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS and an impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They have taken significant steps this past year toward better supporting beamlines and users. The number of user science support staff has been increased by about ten positions. They have also worked with their users, DOE, and the other DOE synchrotron facilities to develop a new, more flexible user access policy. Doing things safely remains a top priority, and they are reviewing their training and safety requirements to ensure they are thoroughmore » and everyone fully understands the necessity of abiding by them. A major development this past year was approval from DOE for BNL to begin the conceptual design of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). The CFN will have a dramatic impact on nanoscience in the Northeast, facilitating the synthesis, characterization and scientific exploration of new classes of novel nanostructured materials. It will be located adjacent to the NSLS and a number of NSLS beamlines will be optimized to serve the needs of the nanoscience community. The NSLS and CFN user programs will be coordinated to facilitate easy access to both in a single visit. The VUV and X-Ray rings operated with excellent reliability as a result of continued attention to aging critical systems. The DUV-FEL achieved several important milestones this year, including production of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) laser light at 400 nm and 266 nm, laser seeded saturation at 266 nm, and the first observation of High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) light at 266 nm, with a third harmonic at 89 nm. Light from the DUV-FEL is now enabling user science experiments in ion pair imaging and they look forward to an expanding user program and a continued series of pioneering accelerator physics studies. In 2002, they continued to work with their user community to develop a plan to upgrade the capabilities of the NSLS. In the short term, they have a number of projects ongoing to upgrade insertion devices and beamlines to provide new and enhanced capabilities to their users. In the long term, recognizing the importance of meeting the future needs of their user community, they are working with DOE to formulate a plan for construction of a new state-of-the-art third-generation storage ring at NSLS to provide world class capabilities to their large and outstandingly productive user community.« less
  • The scientific productivity of the NSLS continues to be outstanding and the research conducted here has high impact. 2003 was no exception and some of the many highlights from this year's research activity are included in this Activity Report. We are especially pleased that one of our users, Professor Roderick MacKinnon (Rockefeller University), was the co-recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work, much of which was done at the NSLS, explaining how proteins known as ion channels help to generate nerve impulses. It is also a particular pleasure to note that NSLS accelerator physicist Li Hua Yumore » was awarded the 2003 International Free Electron Laser Prize in recognition of his outstanding achievements, especially demonstrating High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) at the DUV-FEL. Our vision for the NSLS in the next five to 10 years is for it to continue to serve as a vital resource for the nation and especially for the strong Northeast research community. To accomplish this, we are working to preserve and enhance its outstanding scientific productivity by providing increased user support and upgrading beamline and endstation instrumentation. For example, this past year we collaborated with scientists from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the BNL Biology Department to develop a new undulator beamline, X29, to meet the needs of macromolecular crystallography for high brightness x-rays. A new endstation on the undulator beamline X13B is being equipped with optics and instrumentation for microdiffraction and microprobe experiments. The wiggler beamline, X21, is being upgraded to provide high intensity and increased capacity for small angle x-ray scattering experiments on nanotemplated soft matter, biomaterials, and other systems. We are collaborating with the BNL Center for Functional Nanomaterials to develop a beamline for LEEM/PEEM studies, which will add important new capabilities for nanoscience and catalysis research. A new high-speed, high-resolution curved position sensitive detector for powder diffraction was also developed and made available to users to enable time-resolved studies of reaction mechanisms, phase transformations, chemical kinetics, and material dynamics. At the DUV-FEL, this past year saw the achievement of HGHG light at 266 nm, with a substantial third harmonic at 89 nm. User science experiments were initiated and published in Physical Review Letters and a successful workshop was held to identify the new scientific opportunities in the chemical sciences enabled by this unique light source. These and many other important projects are described more fully in the Facility Report.« less
  • The year 2001 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS, with over 2500 users, including 720 first time users, conducting nearly 1200 experiments in fields ranging from the life, materials, chemical, and environmental sciences to applied science and technology. An impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They include the first demonstration of a direct structural probe of the superconducting ground state in the cuprates by utilizing anomalous soft x-ray resonance effects to selectively enhance the scattering from doped holes. Another highly significant result was the determination of the structure ofmore » the potassium channel membrane protein. This is especially significant as it provides insight into how the channel functions and how it selects a particular kind of ion. In the nanoscience area, small angle x-ray scattering measurements played an essential role in determining that preferential sequestering of tailored metal nanocrystals into a self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymer can produce high quality metallodielectric photonic bandgap structures, demonstrating the potential of these nanocomposites for photonic crystal engineering. The infrared microscopy program continued to yield noteworthy results, including an important study that characterized the types and abundances of organic materials in contaminated and uncontaminated sediments from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. These results will be useful in devising improved methods for the destruction or removal of these environmental contaminants.« less