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Title: Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model

Abstract

Current fluctuations of cathodic arcs were recorded withhigh analog bandwidth (up to 1 GHz) and fast digital sampling (up to 5Gsamples/sec). The power spectral density of the arc current wasdetermined by fast Fourier transform clearly showing material dependent,non-linear features in the frequency domain. These features can beassociated with the non-linear impedance of the conducting channelbetween cathode and anode, driven by the explosive nature of electronemission and plasma formation. The characteristic times of less than 100ns can be associated with individual explosive processes, "ectons," andtherefore represent the short-time physical cutoff for the fractal modelof cathodic arcs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Administrator for the National Nuclear SecurityAdministration,National Security and Non-Proliferation Program.Proliferation Prevention Project IPP-LBNL-T2-196/Argone NationalLaboratory; Russian Foundation for Basic Research Grant#02-05-16256-a
OSTI Identifier:
889246
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59251
R&D Project: Z2N196; BnR: NN4101010
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: May 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70; cathodic vacuum arc noise Fourier analysis

Citation Formats

Anders, Andre, and Oks, Efim. Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Anders, Andre, & Oks, Efim. Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model. United States.
Anders, Andre, and Oks, Efim. Thu . "Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/889246.
@article{osti_889246,
title = {Material-dependent high-frequency current fluctuations of cathodicvacuum arcs: Evidence for the ecton cutoff of the fractal model},
author = {Anders, Andre and Oks, Efim},
abstractNote = {Current fluctuations of cathodic arcs were recorded withhigh analog bandwidth (up to 1 GHz) and fast digital sampling (up to 5Gsamples/sec). The power spectral density of the arc current wasdetermined by fast Fourier transform clearly showing material dependent,non-linear features in the frequency domain. These features can beassociated with the non-linear impedance of the conducting channelbetween cathode and anode, driven by the explosive nature of electronemission and plasma formation. The characteristic times of less than 100ns can be associated with individual explosive processes, "ectons," andtherefore represent the short-time physical cutoff for the fractal modelof cathodic arcs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Current fluctuations of cathodic arcs were recorded with high analog bandwidth (up to 1 GHz) and fast digital sampling (up to 5 Gsamples/s). The power spectral density of the arc current was determined by fast Fourier transform clearly showing material dependent, nonlinear features in the frequency domain. These features can be associated with the nonlinear impedance of the conducting channel between cathode and anode, driven by the explosive nature of electron emission and plasma formation. The characteristic times of less than 100 ns can be associated with individual explosive processes, 'ectons', and therefore represent the short-time physical cutoff for themore » fractal model of cathodic arcs.« less
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