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Title: Production of Hydrogen From Plastics by Pyrolysis and Catalytic Steam Reform

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889145
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Fuels; Journal Issue: 2, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN; PLASTICS; PRODUCTION; PYROLYSIS; STEAM; BioPower; Hydrogen

Citation Formats

Czernik, S., and French, R. J. Production of Hydrogen From Plastics by Pyrolysis and Catalytic Steam Reform. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/ef050354h.
Czernik, S., & French, R. J. Production of Hydrogen From Plastics by Pyrolysis and Catalytic Steam Reform. United States. doi:10.1021/ef050354h.
Czernik, S., and French, R. J. Sun . "Production of Hydrogen From Plastics by Pyrolysis and Catalytic Steam Reform". United States. doi:10.1021/ef050354h.
@article{osti_889145,
title = {Production of Hydrogen From Plastics by Pyrolysis and Catalytic Steam Reform},
author = {Czernik, S. and French, R. J.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1021/ef050354h},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 2, 2006,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step.more » Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.« less