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Title: Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation

Abstract

We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbeinduced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
889086
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth, 110:Article NO. G02009; Journal Volume: 110
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DESULFOVIBRIO; MONITORING; NUTRIENTS; PRECIPITATION; SAMPLING; SENSITIVITY; SULFATES; SULFIDES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; REDUCTION; ELECTRIC FIELDS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios, Williams, Kenneth H., Slater, Lee D., and Hubbard, Susan S. Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1029/2005JG000024.
Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios, Williams, Kenneth H., Slater, Lee D., & Hubbard, Susan S. Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation. United States. doi:10.1029/2005JG000024.
Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios, Williams, Kenneth H., Slater, Lee D., and Hubbard, Susan S. Sat . "Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation". United States. doi:10.1029/2005JG000024.
@article{osti_889086,
title = {Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation},
author = {Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios and Williams, Kenneth H. and Slater, Lee D. and Hubbard, Susan S.},
abstractNote = {We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbeinduced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base.},
doi = {10.1029/2005JG000024},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth, 110:Article NO. G02009},
number = ,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Nov 19 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sat Nov 19 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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