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Title: Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold

Abstract

The use of n-alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers on gold has blossomed in the past few years. These systems have functioned as models for common interfaces. Thiolate monolayers are ideal because they are easily modified before or after deposition. The works contained within this dissertation include interfacial characterization (inbred reflection absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, scanning probe microscopy, and heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics) and various modeling scenarios. The results of these characterizations present ground-breaking insights into the structure, function, and reproducible preparation of these monolayers. Surprisingly, three interfacial properties (electron-transfer, contact angle, and ellipsometry) were discovered to depend directly on the odd-even character of the monolayer components. Molecular modeling was utilized to investigate adlayer orientation, and suggests that these effects are adlayer structure specific. Finally, the electric force microscopy and theoretical modeling investigations of monolayer samples are presented, which show that the film dielectric constant, thickness, and dipole moment directly affect image contrast. In addition, the prospects for utilization of this emerging technique are outlined.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
888936
Report Number(s):
IS-T 2042
TRN: US200619%%312
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-Eng-82
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; DEPOSITION; DIPOLE MOMENTS; ELECTRON TRANSFER; ELLIPSOMETRY; GOLD; KINETICS; MICROSCOPY; ORIENTATION; PERMITTIVITY; PROBES; REFLECTION; SIMULATION; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Edwards, Grant Alvin. Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/888936.
Edwards, Grant Alvin. Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold. United States. doi:10.2172/888936.
Edwards, Grant Alvin. Sun . "Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold". United States. doi:10.2172/888936. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/888936.
@article{osti_888936,
title = {Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold},
author = {Edwards, Grant Alvin},
abstractNote = {The use of n-alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers on gold has blossomed in the past few years. These systems have functioned as models for common interfaces. Thiolate monolayers are ideal because they are easily modified before or after deposition. The works contained within this dissertation include interfacial characterization (inbred reflection absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, scanning probe microscopy, and heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics) and various modeling scenarios. The results of these characterizations present ground-breaking insights into the structure, function, and reproducible preparation of these monolayers. Surprisingly, three interfacial properties (electron-transfer, contact angle, and ellipsometry) were discovered to depend directly on the odd-even character of the monolayer components. Molecular modeling was utilized to investigate adlayer orientation, and suggests that these effects are adlayer structure specific. Finally, the electric force microscopy and theoretical modeling investigations of monolayer samples are presented, which show that the film dielectric constant, thickness, and dipole moment directly affect image contrast. In addition, the prospects for utilization of this emerging technique are outlined.},
doi = {10.2172/888936},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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  • The use of n-alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers on gold has blossomed in the past few years. These systems have functioned as models for common interfaces. Thiolate monolayers are ideal because they are easily modified before or after deposition. The works contained within this dissertation include interfacial characterization (infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, scanning probe microscopy, and heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics) and various modeling scenarios. The results of these characterizations present ground-breaking insights into the structure, function, and reproducible preparation of these monolayers. Surprisingly, three interfacial properties (electron-transfer, contact angle, and ellipsometry) were discovered to depend directly on the odd-even charactermore » of the monolayer components. Molecular modeling was utilized to investigate adlayer orientation, and suggests that these effects are adlayer structure specific. Finally, the electric force microscopy and theoretical modeling investigations of monolayer samples are presented, which show that the film dielectric constant, thickness, and dipole moment directly affect image contrast. In addition, the prospects for utilization of this emerging technique are outlined.« less
  • Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation formore » counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.« less
  • Purpose is to understand how the mobilization, dielectric, orientation, composition, coverage, and structure of self-assembled organic monolayers on metal surfaces affects the surface reactivities and properties of these films in order to facilitate the construction of desired films. Two model systems were used: tiols at Au and aromatic acids at Pt. Surface analysis methods, including contact angle, electrochemistry, ellipsometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), and x-ray photospectroscopy, were used to study the self-assembled organic monolayers on Au and Pt. IRRAS, contact angle, and electrochemistry were used to determine the surface pK a of phenylcarboxylic acids and pyridylcarboxylic acids monolayers onmore » Pt. These techniques were also used to determine the orientation of polymethylene chain axis and the carboxylic follow the structural evolution of the chains and end group of the thiolate monolayers during formation. IRRAS was also used to assess the carboxylic acid group in terms of its possible existence as the non-hydrogen-bonded species, the hydrogen-bonded dimeric group, and the hydrogen-bonded polymeric group. These different forms of the end group were also followed vs coverage, as well as the reactivity vs solution pH. IRRAS and contact angle were used to calculate the rate constant of the esterification of carboxylic acid-terminated monolayers on Au.« less
  • A main research interest is the characterization of monolayers formed by the spontaneous adsorption of organosulfur compounds at gold. This dissertation describes the development and application of long optical pathlength thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry in an attempt to address key issues regarding the reactivity of surface-immobilized molecules. The first section of this introductory chapter briefly describes the general approach to the preparation and characterization of these films. The last section provides an overview of the main principles and advantages of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry for studying surface-adsorbed species. The body of this dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 2 consists of a papermore » describing the design, construction, and characterization of a cuvette-based LOPTLC. Chapter 3 is a paper which examines the reductive desorption process using thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to monitor and identify the desorption product. Chapter 4 is a paper describing the characterization of monolayers functionalized with a catechol terminal group which serves as a redox transformable coordination site for metal ion binding. Chapter 5 discusses the application of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to acid-base reactivity studies of surface-immobilized molecules. The final section provides some general conclusions and a prospectus for future studies. These chapters have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base. This report contains the introduction, references, and general conclusions. 78 refs.« less
  • This dissertation presented several results which add to the general knowledge base regarding organothiolates monolayer spontaneously adsorbed at gold films. Common to the body of this work is the use of voltammetric reductive resorption and variants of scanning probe microscopy to gain insight into the nature of the monolayer formation process as well as the resulting interface. The most significant result from this work is the success of using friction force microscopy to discriminate the end group orientation of monolayer chemisorbed at smooth gold surfaces with micrometer resolution (Chapter 4). The ability to detect the differences in the orientational dispositionmore » is demonstrated by the use PDMS polymer stamp to microcontact print an adlayer of n-alkanethiolate of length n in a predefine pattern onto a gold surface, followed by the solution deposition of a n-alkanethiol of n ┬▒ 1 to fill in the areas on the gold surface intentionally not coated by the stamping process. These two-component monolayers can be discriminated by using friction force microscopy which detects differences in friction contributed by the differences in the orientation of the terminal groups at surfaces. This success has recently led to the detection of the orientation differences at nanometer scale. Although the substrates examined in this work consisted entirely of smooth gold films, the same test can be performed on other smooth substrates and monolayer materials.« less