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Title: Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.

Abstract

Plants may not occur in a given area if there are no suitable sites for seeds to establish (microsite limitation), if seeds fail to arrive in suitable microsites (dispersal limitation) or if seeds in suitable microsites are destroyed by predators (predator limitation). When dispersal and microsites are not limiting, the role of local seed predators can be important for generating emergent, large-scale patterns of plant abundance across landscapes. Moreover, because predators may generate large-scale patterns that resemble other forms of limitation and predators may target specific species, predator impacts should be more frequently incorporated into experiments on the role of seed limitation and plant community composition.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
886950
Report Number(s):
na
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0477; JECOAB; 06-06-P; TRN: US201103%%55
DOE Contract Number:
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Ecology; Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; SEEDS; TARGETS; microsite limitation; predator limitation; seed addition; seed dispersal; seed limitation

Citation Formats

Orrock, John, L., Douglas J. Levey, Brent J. Danielson, and Ellen I Damschen.. Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2745.2006.01125.x.
Orrock, John, L., Douglas J. Levey, Brent J. Danielson, & Ellen I Damschen.. Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2745.2006.01125.x.
Orrock, John, L., Douglas J. Levey, Brent J. Danielson, and Ellen I Damschen.. Sun . "Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2745.2006.01125.x.
@article{osti_886950,
title = {Seed predation, not seed dispersal, explains the landscape-level abundance of an early-successional plant.},
author = {Orrock, John, L. and Douglas J. Levey and Brent J. Danielson and Ellen I Damschen.},
abstractNote = {Plants may not occur in a given area if there are no suitable sites for seeds to establish (microsite limitation), if seeds fail to arrive in suitable microsites (dispersal limitation) or if seeds in suitable microsites are destroyed by predators (predator limitation). When dispersal and microsites are not limiting, the role of local seed predators can be important for generating emergent, large-scale patterns of plant abundance across landscapes. Moreover, because predators may generate large-scale patterns that resemble other forms of limitation and predators may target specific species, predator impacts should be more frequently incorporated into experiments on the role of seed limitation and plant community composition.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1365-2745.2006.01125.x},
journal = {Journal of Ecology},
number = 1,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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