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Title: Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

Abstract

The dynamic response of the suspension spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (SFOBB) have been numerically modeled in a case-study to investigate the effects of long-period, near-field ground motions on flexible suspension bridges. The structural simulation model used in the study was developed as a special purpose computer program tailored to efficiently simulate the nonlinear response of cable supported bridges. The simulation model includes a number of special element technologies and solution algorithms that enable efficient nonlinear analysis of suspension bridges. The ground motions used in the study were site specific synthetic records for a Mw=7.25 earthquake along the Hayward fault at 12-15 km distant, and actual measured near-field records from the Izmit Turkey (1999) and Chi-Chi Taiwan (1999) earthquakes. These records include near- and far-field broad-band motions for three components. The results of the numerical simulations indicate that low frequency waveforms associated with near-field motions can place a significant demand on the structural systems of suspension bridges, and must be accounted for in suspension bridge analysis and design.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
886680
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-216798
TRN: US200616%%1105
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 8th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering, San Francisco, CA, United States, Apr 18 - Apr 22, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; CABLES; COMPUTER CODES; DESIGN; EARTHQUAKES; GROUND MOTION; SIMULATION; TAIWAN; TURKEY; WAVE FORMS

Citation Formats

McCallen, D, Astaneh-Asl, A, Larsen, S, and Hutchings, L. Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
McCallen, D, Astaneh-Asl, A, Larsen, S, & Hutchings, L. Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. United States.
McCallen, D, Astaneh-Asl, A, Larsen, S, and Hutchings, L. Thu . "Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/886680.
@article{osti_886680,
title = {Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge},
author = {McCallen, D and Astaneh-Asl, A and Larsen, S and Hutchings, L},
abstractNote = {The dynamic response of the suspension spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (SFOBB) have been numerically modeled in a case-study to investigate the effects of long-period, near-field ground motions on flexible suspension bridges. The structural simulation model used in the study was developed as a special purpose computer program tailored to efficiently simulate the nonlinear response of cable supported bridges. The simulation model includes a number of special element technologies and solution algorithms that enable efficient nonlinear analysis of suspension bridges. The ground motions used in the study were site specific synthetic records for a Mw=7.25 earthquake along the Hayward fault at 12-15 km distant, and actual measured near-field records from the Izmit Turkey (1999) and Chi-Chi Taiwan (1999) earthquakes. These records include near- and far-field broad-band motions for three components. The results of the numerical simulations indicate that low frequency waveforms associated with near-field motions can place a significant demand on the structural systems of suspension bridges, and must be accounted for in suspension bridge analysis and design.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 03 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Nov 03 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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