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Title: Third harmonic generation in air as a function of wavelength, f-number, and incident energy.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ; ; ; ;
  1. (Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
886651
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0722C
TRN: US0603988
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the CLEO Conference,held May 21-26, 2006 in Long Beach, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CLEO STELLARATOR; HARMONIC GENERATION; WAVELENGTHS; ENERGY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Rudd, James Van, Bodner, John, Law, R. J., Rivera, Mike, Luk, Ting Shan, Naudeau, Madeline L., Nelson, Thomas Robert, and Cameron, Stewart M. Third harmonic generation in air as a function of wavelength, f-number, and incident energy.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Rudd, James Van, Bodner, John, Law, R. J., Rivera, Mike, Luk, Ting Shan, Naudeau, Madeline L., Nelson, Thomas Robert, & Cameron, Stewart M. Third harmonic generation in air as a function of wavelength, f-number, and incident energy.. United States.
Rudd, James Van, Bodner, John, Law, R. J., Rivera, Mike, Luk, Ting Shan, Naudeau, Madeline L., Nelson, Thomas Robert, and Cameron, Stewart M. Wed . "Third harmonic generation in air as a function of wavelength, f-number, and incident energy.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_886651,
title = {Third harmonic generation in air as a function of wavelength, f-number, and incident energy.},
author = {Rudd, James Van and Bodner, John and Law, R. J. and Rivera, Mike and Luk, Ting Shan and Naudeau, Madeline L. and Nelson, Thomas Robert and Cameron, Stewart M.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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