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Title: Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report

Abstract

The United States Air Force Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratories (PMEL) calibrate over 1,000 anemometer probes per year. To facilitate a more efficient calibration process for probe-style anemometers, the Air Force Metrology and Calibration Program underwent an effort to modernize the existing PMEL bench top wind tunnels. Through a joint effort with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the performance of PMEL wind tunnels was improved. The improvement consisted of new high accuracy sensors, automatic data acquisition, and a software-driven calibration process. As part of the wind tunnel upgrades, an uncertainty analysis was completed, laser Doppler velocimeter profiling was conducted to characterize the velocities at probe locations in the wind tunnel, and pitot tube calibrations of the wind tunnel were verified. The bench top wind tunnel accuracy and repeatability has been measured for nine prototype wind tunnel systems and valuable field experience has been gained with these wind tunnels at the PMELs. This report describes the requirements for the wind tunnel improvements along with actual implementation strategies and details. Lessons-learned from the automation, the velocity profiling, and the software-driven calibration process will also be discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
886016
Report Number(s):
R06-124682
TRN: US200617%%480
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ACCURACY; ANEMOMETERS; AUTOMATION; CALIBRATION; DATA ACQUISITION; IMPLEMENTATION; LASERS; ORNL; PERFORMANCE; PITOT TUBES; PROBES; VELOCIMETERS; VELOCITY; WIND TUNNELS

Citation Formats

Hardy, J.E. Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/886016.
Hardy, J.E. Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report. United States. doi:10.2172/886016.
Hardy, J.E. Thu . "Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report". United States. doi:10.2172/886016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/886016.
@article{osti_886016,
title = {Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report},
author = {Hardy, J.E.},
abstractNote = {The United States Air Force Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratories (PMEL) calibrate over 1,000 anemometer probes per year. To facilitate a more efficient calibration process for probe-style anemometers, the Air Force Metrology and Calibration Program underwent an effort to modernize the existing PMEL bench top wind tunnels. Through a joint effort with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the performance of PMEL wind tunnels was improved. The improvement consisted of new high accuracy sensors, automatic data acquisition, and a software-driven calibration process. As part of the wind tunnel upgrades, an uncertainty analysis was completed, laser Doppler velocimeter profiling was conducted to characterize the velocities at probe locations in the wind tunnel, and pitot tube calibrations of the wind tunnel were verified. The bench top wind tunnel accuracy and repeatability has been measured for nine prototype wind tunnel systems and valuable field experience has been gained with these wind tunnels at the PMELs. This report describes the requirements for the wind tunnel improvements along with actual implementation strategies and details. Lessons-learned from the automation, the velocity profiling, and the software-driven calibration process will also be discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/886016},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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