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Title: Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor

Abstract

In this project, personnel at Tulane University and Sapidyne Instruments Inc. developed an in-line uranium immunosensor that could be used to determine the efficacy of specific in situ biostimulation approaches. This sensor was designed to operate autonomously over relatively long periods of time (2-10 days) and was able to provide near real-time data about uranium immobilization in the absence of personnel at the site of the biostimulation experiments. An alpha prototype of the in-line immmunosensor was delivered from Sapidyne Instruments to Tulane University in December of 2002 and a beta prototype was delivered in November of 2003. The beta prototype of this instrument (now available commercially from Sapidyne Instruments) was programmed to autonomously dilute standard uranium to final concentrations of 2.5 to 100 nM (0.6 to 24 ppb) in buffer containing a fluorescently labeled anti-uranium antibody and the uranium chelator, 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10-phenanthroline. The assay limit of detection for hexavalent uranium was 5.8 nM or 1.38 ppb. This limit of detection is well below the drinking water standard of 30 ppb recently promulgated by the EPA. The assay showed excellent precision; the coefficients of variation (CV’s) in the linear range of the assay were less than 5% and CV’s never rose abovemore » 14%. Analytical recovery in the immunosensors-based assay was assessed by adding variable known quantities of uranium to purified water samples. A quantitative recovery (93.75% - 108.17%) was obtained for sample with concentrations from 7.5 to 20 nM (2-4.75 ppb). In August of 2005 the sensor was transported to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for testing of water samples at the Criddle test site (see Wu et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 40:3978-3985 2006 for a description of this site). In this first on-site test, the in-line sensor was able to accurately detect changes in the concentrations of uranium in effluent samples from this site. Although the absolute values for the uranium concentrations were approximately 30% lower that what was determined with the ICP-MS at the site, the in-line sensor could correctly assess changes in the uranium concentrations in near real-time.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
885353
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/63459-1
TRN: US0703109
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-02ER63459
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACCURACY; BUFFERS; DETECTION; DRINKING WATER; ORNL; PERSONNEL; TESTING; URANIUM; US EPA; WATER; uranium; immunosensor; bioremediation; assessment

Citation Formats

Blake, Diane A. Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/885353.
Blake, Diane A. Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor. United States. doi:10.2172/885353.
Blake, Diane A. Wed . "Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor". United States. doi:10.2172/885353. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/885353.
@article{osti_885353,
title = {Final Technical Report - In-line Uranium Immunosensor},
author = {Blake, Diane A.},
abstractNote = {In this project, personnel at Tulane University and Sapidyne Instruments Inc. developed an in-line uranium immunosensor that could be used to determine the efficacy of specific in situ biostimulation approaches. This sensor was designed to operate autonomously over relatively long periods of time (2-10 days) and was able to provide near real-time data about uranium immobilization in the absence of personnel at the site of the biostimulation experiments. An alpha prototype of the in-line immmunosensor was delivered from Sapidyne Instruments to Tulane University in December of 2002 and a beta prototype was delivered in November of 2003. The beta prototype of this instrument (now available commercially from Sapidyne Instruments) was programmed to autonomously dilute standard uranium to final concentrations of 2.5 to 100 nM (0.6 to 24 ppb) in buffer containing a fluorescently labeled anti-uranium antibody and the uranium chelator, 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10-phenanthroline. The assay limit of detection for hexavalent uranium was 5.8 nM or 1.38 ppb. This limit of detection is well below the drinking water standard of 30 ppb recently promulgated by the EPA. The assay showed excellent precision; the coefficients of variation (CV’s) in the linear range of the assay were less than 5% and CV’s never rose above 14%. Analytical recovery in the immunosensors-based assay was assessed by adding variable known quantities of uranium to purified water samples. A quantitative recovery (93.75% - 108.17%) was obtained for sample with concentrations from 7.5 to 20 nM (2-4.75 ppb). In August of 2005 the sensor was transported to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for testing of water samples at the Criddle test site (see Wu et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 40:3978-3985 2006 for a description of this site). In this first on-site test, the in-line sensor was able to accurately detect changes in the concentrations of uranium in effluent samples from this site. Although the absolute values for the uranium concentrations were approximately 30% lower that what was determined with the ICP-MS at the site, the in-line sensor could correctly assess changes in the uranium concentrations in near real-time.},
doi = {10.2172/885353},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

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