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Title: Templated synthesis of mesoporous titanium phosphates for the sequestration of radionuclides

Abstract

Several mesoporous titanium phosphate phases, with varying pore sizes, were prepared using non-ionic surfactants and easily handled titanium precursors under mild reaction conditions. Preliminary testing reveals that these materials have high affinity for certain radionuclides of environmental concern. Significant amounts of radioactive waste have built up over the last half century as the result of nuclear weapons production and the accumulation of spent nuclear fuel. Ultimately, after processing, this waste is targeted to be buried in a deep geological repository. One plan is to include ''getter materials'' in with this waste in order to sequester any radionuclides that might leak from the wasteforms. Of particular interest in this regard are the long-lived actinide species (e.g. Pu, Am, Np, etc.) and the anions (e.g. pertechnetate, iodide, etc.). These getter materials must be able to survive long-term exposure to elevated temperatures (>150 C) and moderately high radiation fluxes. Due to their frailty towards radiolytic degradation, organic components cannot be used for either structure or function in the final getter material.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
885194
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-46567
2417; TRN: US200621%%874
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Inorganic Chemistry Communications, 9(3):293-295
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; ACTINIDES; AFFINITY; ANIONS; GETTERS; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROCESSING; RADIATIONS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOISOTOPES; SURFACTANTS; SYNTHESIS; TESTING; TITANIUM; TITANIUM PHOSPHATES; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; SPENT FUELS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Li, Xiaohong S., Courtney, Andrea R., Yantasee, Wassana, Mattigod, Shas V., and Fryxell, Glen E.. Templated synthesis of mesoporous titanium phosphates for the sequestration of radionuclides. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.inoche.2005.11.014.
Li, Xiaohong S., Courtney, Andrea R., Yantasee, Wassana, Mattigod, Shas V., & Fryxell, Glen E.. Templated synthesis of mesoporous titanium phosphates for the sequestration of radionuclides. United States. doi:10.1016/j.inoche.2005.11.014.
Li, Xiaohong S., Courtney, Andrea R., Yantasee, Wassana, Mattigod, Shas V., and Fryxell, Glen E.. Wed . "Templated synthesis of mesoporous titanium phosphates for the sequestration of radionuclides". United States. doi:10.1016/j.inoche.2005.11.014.
@article{osti_885194,
title = {Templated synthesis of mesoporous titanium phosphates for the sequestration of radionuclides},
author = {Li, Xiaohong S. and Courtney, Andrea R. and Yantasee, Wassana and Mattigod, Shas V. and Fryxell, Glen E.},
abstractNote = {Several mesoporous titanium phosphate phases, with varying pore sizes, were prepared using non-ionic surfactants and easily handled titanium precursors under mild reaction conditions. Preliminary testing reveals that these materials have high affinity for certain radionuclides of environmental concern. Significant amounts of radioactive waste have built up over the last half century as the result of nuclear weapons production and the accumulation of spent nuclear fuel. Ultimately, after processing, this waste is targeted to be buried in a deep geological repository. One plan is to include ''getter materials'' in with this waste in order to sequester any radionuclides that might leak from the wasteforms. Of particular interest in this regard are the long-lived actinide species (e.g. Pu, Am, Np, etc.) and the anions (e.g. pertechnetate, iodide, etc.). These getter materials must be able to survive long-term exposure to elevated temperatures (>150 C) and moderately high radiation fluxes. Due to their frailty towards radiolytic degradation, organic components cannot be used for either structure or function in the final getter material.},
doi = {10.1016/j.inoche.2005.11.014},
journal = {Inorganic Chemistry Communications, 9(3):293-295},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}