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Title: USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA

Abstract

The use of multi-coupled electrode arrays in various corrosion applications is discussed with the main goal of advancing the understanding of various corrosion phenomena. Both close packed and far spaced electrode configurations are discussed. Far spaced electrode arrays are optimized for high throughput experiments capable of elucidating the effects of various variables on corrosion properties. For instance the effects of a statistical distribution of flaws on corrosion properties can be examined. Close packed arrays enable unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the behavior of local anodes and cathodes. Interactions between corrosion sites can trigger or inhibit corrosion phenomena and affect corrosion damage evolution.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
884960
Report Number(s):
NA
MOL.20060330.0274, DC#47020; TRN: US200616%%164
DOE Contract Number:
NA
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANODES; CATHODES; CORROSION; DEFECTS; KINETICS

Citation Formats

N.D. Budiansky, F. Bocher, H. Cong, M.F. Hurley, and J.R. Scully. USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/884960.
N.D. Budiansky, F. Bocher, H. Cong, M.F. Hurley, & J.R. Scully. USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA. United States. doi:10.2172/884960.
N.D. Budiansky, F. Bocher, H. Cong, M.F. Hurley, and J.R. Scully. Thu . "USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA". United States. doi:10.2172/884960. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/884960.
@article{osti_884960,
title = {USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA},
author = {N.D. Budiansky and F. Bocher and H. Cong and M.F. Hurley and J.R. Scully},
abstractNote = {The use of multi-coupled electrode arrays in various corrosion applications is discussed with the main goal of advancing the understanding of various corrosion phenomena. Both close packed and far spaced electrode configurations are discussed. Far spaced electrode arrays are optimized for high throughput experiments capable of elucidating the effects of various variables on corrosion properties. For instance the effects of a statistical distribution of flaws on corrosion properties can be examined. Close packed arrays enable unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the behavior of local anodes and cathodes. Interactions between corrosion sites can trigger or inhibit corrosion phenomena and affect corrosion damage evolution.},
doi = {10.2172/884960},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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