skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
884899
Report Number(s):
NA
MOL.20060405.0089, DC#47104; TRN: US200616%%201
DOE Contract Number:
NA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL, San Diego, CA - March 13, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CREVICE CORROSION; STAINLESS STEELS; MATERIALS

Citation Formats

F. Bocher, F. Presuel-Moreno, N.D. Budiansky, and J.R. Scully. COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
F. Bocher, F. Presuel-Moreno, N.D. Budiansky, & J.R. Scully. COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL. United States.
F. Bocher, F. Presuel-Moreno, N.D. Budiansky, and J.R. Scully. Mon . "COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/884899.
@article{osti_884899,
title = {COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE INVESTIGATION OF CREVICE CORROSION OF 316 STAINLESS STEEL},
author = {F. Bocher and F. Presuel-Moreno and N.D. Budiansky and J.R. Scully},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Crevice corrosion is currently studied using either one of two techniques depending on the data needed. The first method is a multi-crevice former over a metallic sample; this provides information on the severity of crevice corrosion (depth, position, frequency) but delivers little to no electrochemical information [1]. The second method involves the potentiodynamic or potentiostatic study of an uncreviced sample in model crevice solution or under a crevice former in aggressive solution [2]. Crevice corrosion is highly dependent on the position in the crevice. The distance from the crevice mouth will affect the depth of attack, the solution composition andmore » pH, and the ohmic drop and the true potential in the crevice [3-6]. These in turn affect the current density as a function of potential and position. An Multi-Channel Micro-Electrode Analyzer' (MMA) has been recently used to demonstrate the interaction between localized corrosion sites (pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion) [7]. MMA can provide spatial resolution of electrochemical properties in the crevice. By coupling such a tool with scaling laws derived from experimental data (a simple equation linking the depth of crevice corrosion initiation to the crevice gap), it is possible to produce highly instrumented crevices, rescaled to enable spatial resolution of local corrosion processes. In this study, the use of multi-wires arrays (up to 100 closed packed wires simulating a planar electrode, divided in 10 distinctively controllable groups) electrically coupled through zero resistance ammeters enables the observation of the current evolution as a function of position inside and outside the crevice. For instance, the location of crevice initiation sites and propagation behavior can be studied under various conditions. Experiments can be conducted with various realistic variables. These can either be electrochemical (such as proximate cathode) or physical (crevice former material or position). Using new impedance-capable MMA, it is also possible to monitor the film breakdown and the early stages of crevice corrosion as a function of the wires position. In this talk, the use of multi-electrode array to study crevice corrosion of 316 stainless steel and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy is reviewed.« less
  • Crevice corrosion is currently studied using either one of two techniques depending on the data needed. The first method is a multi-crevice former over a metallic sample; this provides information on the severity of crevice corrosion (depth, position, frequency) but delivers little to no electrochemical information [1]. The second method involves the potentiodynamic or potentiostatic study of an uncreviced sample in model crevice solution or under a crevice former in aggressive solution [2]. Crevice corrosion is highly dependent on the position in the crevice. The distance from the crevice mouth will affect the depth of attack, the solution composition andmore » pH, and the ohmic drop and the true potential in the crevice [3-6]. These in turn affect the current density as a function of potential and position. A Multi-Channel Micro-Electrode Analyzer (MMA) has been recently used to demonstrate the interaction between localized corrosion sites (pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion) [7]. MMA can provide spatial resolution of electrochemical properties in the crevice. By coupling such a tool with scaling laws derived from experimental data (a simple equation linking the depth of crevice corrosion initiation to the crevice gap), it is possible to produce highly instrumented crevices, rescaled to enable spatial resolution of local corrosion processes. In this study, the use of multi-wires arrays (up to 100 closed packed wires simulating a planar electrode, divided in 10 distinctively controllable groups) electrically coupled through zero resistance ammeters enables the observation of the current evolution as a function of position inside and outside the crevice. For instance, the location of crevice initiation sites and propagation behavior can be studied under various conditions. Experiments can be conducted with various realistic variables. These can either be electrochemical (such as proximate cathode) or physical (crevice former material or position). Using new impedance-capable MMA, it is also possible to monitor the film breakdown and the early stages of crevice corrosion as a function of the wires position. In this talk, the use of multi-electrode array to study crevice corrosion of 316 stainless steel and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy is reviewed.« less
  • Crevice corrosion is currently mostly studied using either one of two techniques depending on the information desired. The first method involves two multicrevice formers or washers fastened on both sides of a sample plate. This technique provides exposure information regarding the severity of crevice corrosion (depth, position, frequency of attack) but delivers little or no electrochemical information. The second method involves the potentiodynamic or potentiostatic study of an uncreviced sample in a model crevice solution or under a crevice former in aggressive solution where crevice corrosion may initiate and propagate and global current is recorded. However, crevice corrosion initiation andmore » propagation behavior is highly dependent on exact position in the crevice over time. The distance from the crevice mouth will affect the solution composition, the pH, the ohmic potential drop and the true potential in the crevice. Coupled multi-electrode arrays (MEA) were used to study crevice corrosion in order to take in account spatial and temporal evolution of electrochemistry simultaneously. Scaling laws were used to rescale the crevice geometry while keeping the corrosion electrochemical properties equivalent to that of a natural crevice at a smaller length scale. one of the advantages was to be able to use commercial alloys available as wires electrode and, in the case of MEA, to spread the crevice corrosion over many individual electrodes so each one of them will have a near homogeneous electrochemical behavior. The initial step was to obtain anodic polarization curves for the relevant material in acid chloride solution which simulated the crevice electrolyte. using the software Crevicer{trademark}, the potential distribution inside the crevice as a function of the distance from the crevice mouth was determined for various crevice gaps and applied potentials, assuming constant chemistry throughout the crevice. The crevice corrosion initiation location x{sub crit} is the position where the potential drops to E{sub Flade}. Figure 1 illustrates the resulting x{sub crit} vs. G scaling laws for 316 Stainless Steel in 1 M HCl at 50 C. The coupled multi-wire array is composed of one hundred identical 316 Stainless Steel wires in a five by twenty formation inserted in a groove of a 316 Stainless Steel rod such that the ends of the wires are flush mounted with the rod. The 100 wires are coupled electrically through in-line zero resistance ammeters. The diameter of the wires (250 {micro}m) was chosen so that x{sub crit} (critical initiation distance from the crevice mouth) and the expected zone of crevice corrosion (predicted from the scaling law) would be larger than the radius of a single wire. The array created a flush mounted planar electrode with the surface/volume ratio obtained in planar crevices. The observation of the current evolution as a function of position inside and outside the crevice as function of time was made possible as illustrated in Figure 2 in 0.6 M NaCl at 50 C.« less
  • Close packed coupled multi-electrodes arrays (MEA) simulating a planar electrode were used to measure the current evolution as a function of position during initiation and propagation of crevice corrosion of AISI 316 stainless steel. Scaling laws derived from polarization data enabled the use of rescaled crevices providing spatial resolution. Crevice corrosion of AISI 316 stainless steel in 0.6 M NaCl at 50 C was found to initiate close to the crevice mouth and to spread inwards with time. The local crevice current density increased dramatically over a short period to reach a limiting value.
  • Alloy 33 is a (wt. %) 33 Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6CU-0.4N austenitic stainless steel combining high yield strength of min. 380 N/mm{sup 2} (55 KSI) with high resistance to local corrosion and superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Ranking the material according to its PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) value, the new alloy fits in between the advanced 6% Mo superaustenitics and the nickel-base Alloy 625 but due to the balanced chemical composition the alloy shows a lot less sensitivity to segregation in the base material as well as in welded structures. It is recommended to weld the material with matching filler. The criticalmore » pitting temperature of such joints in the 10% FeCl{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot} 6H{sub 2}O solution is reduced by only 10 C in comparison to the base material. Corrosion tests in artificial seawater (20 g/l Cl{sup {minus}}) with additions of chloride up to 37 g/l as well as in a NaCl-CaCl{sub 2}, solution with 62 g/l Cl{sup {minus}}--revealed that the critical pitting temperature does not differentiate from the 6% Mo austenitic steel Alloy 926. With respect to crevice corrosion the depassivation pH value has been determined in 1 M NaCl solution according to Crolet and again there was no difference between Alloy 33 and Alloy 926. SCC tests performed on Alloy 33 in the solution annealed condition as well as after heavy cold work up to R{sub PO,2} {approx} 1,100--1,200 N/mm{sup 2} (160--174 KSI) indicate the high resistance to stress corrosion cracking in hot sodium chloride solutions.« less