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Title: Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.

Abstract

In this report, we characterize the key themes of transformation and tie them together in a ''how to'' guide. The perspectives were synthesized from strategic management literature, case studies, and from interviews with key management personnel from private industry on their transformation experiences.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
884723
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-2228
TRN: US200616%%25
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; MANUALS; MANAGEMENT; PERSONNEL; TRANSFORMATIONS; INDUSTRY

Citation Formats

Slavin, Adam M., and Woodard, Joan Brune. Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/884723.
Slavin, Adam M., & Woodard, Joan Brune. Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.. United States. doi:10.2172/884723.
Slavin, Adam M., and Woodard, Joan Brune. Mon . "Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.". United States. doi:10.2172/884723. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/884723.
@article{osti_884723,
title = {Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.},
author = {Slavin, Adam M. and Woodard, Joan Brune},
abstractNote = {In this report, we characterize the key themes of transformation and tie them together in a ''how to'' guide. The perspectives were synthesized from strategic management literature, case studies, and from interviews with key management personnel from private industry on their transformation experiences.},
doi = {10.2172/884723},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

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