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Title: Why every national deep-geological-isolation program needs a long-term science & technology component

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to set down the rationale for a separate Science & Technology (S&T) Program within every national deep-geological-isolation program. The fundamental rationale for such a Program is to provide a dedicated focus for longer-term science and technology activities that ultimately will benefit the whole repository mission. Such a Program, separately funded and with a dedicated staff (separate from the ''mainline'' activities to develop the repository, the surface facilities, and the transportation system), can devote itself exclusively to the development and management of a long-term science and technology program. Broad experience in governments worldwide has demonstrated that line offices are unlikely to be able to develop and sustain both the appropriate longer-term philosophy and the specialized skills associated with managing longer-term science and technology projects. Accomplishing both of these requires a separate dedicated program office with its own staff.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
883529
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-218919
TRN: US200615%%98
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: Workshop to Support the Fourth Worldwide Review of Geological Challenges to Radioactive Waste Isolation, Berkeley, CA, United States, Apr 28 - Apr 29, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; MANAGEMENT; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY

Citation Formats

Budnitz, R J. Why every national deep-geological-isolation program needs a long-term science & technology component. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Budnitz, R J. Why every national deep-geological-isolation program needs a long-term science & technology component. United States.
Budnitz, R J. Fri . "Why every national deep-geological-isolation program needs a long-term science & technology component". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/883529.
@article{osti_883529,
title = {Why every national deep-geological-isolation program needs a long-term science & technology component},
author = {Budnitz, R J},
abstractNote = {The objective of this paper is to set down the rationale for a separate Science & Technology (S&T) Program within every national deep-geological-isolation program. The fundamental rationale for such a Program is to provide a dedicated focus for longer-term science and technology activities that ultimately will benefit the whole repository mission. Such a Program, separately funded and with a dedicated staff (separate from the ''mainline'' activities to develop the repository, the surface facilities, and the transportation system), can devote itself exclusively to the development and management of a long-term science and technology program. Broad experience in governments worldwide has demonstrated that line offices are unlikely to be able to develop and sustain both the appropriate longer-term philosophy and the specialized skills associated with managing longer-term science and technology projects. Accomplishing both of these requires a separate dedicated program office with its own staff.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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