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Title: The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite

Abstract

The Tagish Lake C2 (ungrouped) carbonaceous chondrite fall of January 18, 2000 delivered >10 kg of one of the most primitive and physically weak meteorites yet studied. In this paper we report the detailed circumstances of the fall and the recovery of all documented Tagish Lake fragments. We also provide measurements of bulk physical properties (mass, grain and bulk density), bulk triple oxygen-isotope ratios, and short-lived cosmogenic radionuclides counts for several fragments. Ground eyewitnesses and recorded observations of the Tagish Lake fireball event provide a refined estimate of the fireball trajectory, and hence, its pre-atmospheric orbit. From its calculated orbit and its similarity to the remotely-sensed properties of the D and P-class asteroids, the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite represents these outer belt asteroids, and is not of cometary origin. The bulk oxygen-isotope compositions reported here are among the highest known for meteorites. These data plot just below the Terrestrial Fractionation Line, following a trend similar to the CM meteorite mixing line. The bulk density of the Tagish Lake material (1.66 ±0.02 g/cm3) is the same, within error, as the total bulk densities of many C-class and especially D- and P-class asteroids. The high microporosity of Tagish Lake samples (~40%) providesmore » an obvious candidate material for the composition of low bulk density primitive asteroids such as Phobos, Deimos and the P-class binary 87 Sylvia, without requiring a substantial contribution from macroporosity in the form of ice, thick regolith or “rubble pile” assemblages with large interior voids.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882971
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-49711
400409900
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 41(3):407-431
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
fireball(s), meteorite fall, carbonaceous chondrite, orbit(s)

Citation Formats

Hildebrand, Alan R., McCausland, Phil J., Brown, Peter G., Longstaffe, Fred J., Russell, Samuel D., tagliaferri, Edward, Wacker, John F., and Mazur, michael J. The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1945-5100.2006.tb00471.x.
Hildebrand, Alan R., McCausland, Phil J., Brown, Peter G., Longstaffe, Fred J., Russell, Samuel D., tagliaferri, Edward, Wacker, John F., & Mazur, michael J. The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1945-5100.2006.tb00471.x.
Hildebrand, Alan R., McCausland, Phil J., Brown, Peter G., Longstaffe, Fred J., Russell, Samuel D., tagliaferri, Edward, Wacker, John F., and Mazur, michael J. Wed . "The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1945-5100.2006.tb00471.x.
@article{osti_882971,
title = {The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite},
author = {Hildebrand, Alan R. and McCausland, Phil J. and Brown, Peter G. and Longstaffe, Fred J. and Russell, Samuel D. and tagliaferri, Edward and Wacker, John F. and Mazur, michael J.},
abstractNote = {The Tagish Lake C2 (ungrouped) carbonaceous chondrite fall of January 18, 2000 delivered >10 kg of one of the most primitive and physically weak meteorites yet studied. In this paper we report the detailed circumstances of the fall and the recovery of all documented Tagish Lake fragments. We also provide measurements of bulk physical properties (mass, grain and bulk density), bulk triple oxygen-isotope ratios, and short-lived cosmogenic radionuclides counts for several fragments. Ground eyewitnesses and recorded observations of the Tagish Lake fireball event provide a refined estimate of the fireball trajectory, and hence, its pre-atmospheric orbit. From its calculated orbit and its similarity to the remotely-sensed properties of the D and P-class asteroids, the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite represents these outer belt asteroids, and is not of cometary origin. The bulk oxygen-isotope compositions reported here are among the highest known for meteorites. These data plot just below the Terrestrial Fractionation Line, following a trend similar to the CM meteorite mixing line. The bulk density of the Tagish Lake material (1.66 ±0.02 g/cm3) is the same, within error, as the total bulk densities of many C-class and especially D- and P-class asteroids. The high microporosity of Tagish Lake samples (~40%) provides an obvious candidate material for the composition of low bulk density primitive asteroids such as Phobos, Deimos and the P-class binary 87 Sylvia, without requiring a substantial contribution from macroporosity in the form of ice, thick regolith or “rubble pile” assemblages with large interior voids.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1945-5100.2006.tb00471.x},
journal = {Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 41(3):407-431},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}