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Title: ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG

Abstract

As advanced gasification technology is increasingly adopted as an energy source, disposal of the resulting slag will become a problem. We have shown that gasifier slag can be incorporated into foamed glass, which is currently being manufactured as an abrasive and as an insulating material. The slag we add to foamed glass does not simply act as filler, but improves the mechanical properties of the product. Incorporation of gasifier slag can make foamed glass stronger and more abrasion resistant.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Mississippi State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882579
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-04NT42204
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; GAS GENERATORS; SLAGS; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; GLASS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; ABRASIVES

Citation Formats

Olin Perry Norton, Ronald A. Palmer, and W. Gene Ramsey. ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/882579.
Olin Perry Norton, Ronald A. Palmer, & W. Gene Ramsey. ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG. United States. doi:10.2172/882579.
Olin Perry Norton, Ronald A. Palmer, and W. Gene Ramsey. Wed . "ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG". United States. doi:10.2172/882579. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882579.
@article{osti_882579,
title = {ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG},
author = {Olin Perry Norton and Ronald A. Palmer and W. Gene Ramsey},
abstractNote = {As advanced gasification technology is increasingly adopted as an energy source, disposal of the resulting slag will become a problem. We have shown that gasifier slag can be incorporated into foamed glass, which is currently being manufactured as an abrasive and as an insulating material. The slag we add to foamed glass does not simply act as filler, but improves the mechanical properties of the product. Incorporation of gasifier slag can make foamed glass stronger and more abrasion resistant.},
doi = {10.2172/882579},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The report includes conceptual designs for the B and W gasifier including material and energy balances, a process flowsheet, equipment sizes and capital cost estimates. An optimum usse for it would be in a Parsons oil-gas type plant. It has, therefore, been evaluated by comparing it as a substitute for the Parsons gasifier. The conclusions reached are that the process may be technically feasible but would not be competitive with some other processes with respect to economy and energy conservation. In view of the lack of advantages offered by the process and the lower energy conversion efficiency, no further workmore » on the process is recommended.« less
  • Chars vary widely in composition, depending upon the composition of the coal from which the chars are made. All chars have very high carbon contents but may also contain appreciable sulfur as well as inorganic ash (various oxides). The corrosiveness of the char will depend to a large extent on its sulfur content, although other elements may be involved. In general, one may expect that the char-metal reactions will involve simultaneous sulfidation and carburization, which combination is quite different from the usual one of sulfidation and oxidation involved in reactions between metals and coal-gasificaton atmospheres. This study was designed tomore » ascertain the general features of attack on six alloys and to investigate a number of experimental parameters. The char-quantity effect and the role of preoxidation constitute the subject matter of the report.« less
  • Five alloys previously studied (310 stainless, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 671, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 188) plus GE1541 (Fe--15Cr--4Al--1Y) have been exposed to FMC char (2.7%S) and 1800/sup 0/F under a variety of conditions. The corrosion rates appear to follow a linear rate law or perhaps a slightly decreasing rate with time as measured by weight gains. It was found that the weight gains are erroneously high due to embedded char particles in the scale, the particles acting as Kirkendall markers during the reaction. Internal reaction in the form of sulfide particles both within the grains and at grain boundariesmore » was extensive, in some cases completely through the samples (0.125'' thick) in 96 hours. Sulfur depletion of the char results in a char-quantity effect, the greater the amount of char per sample in a given time, the greater the corrosion. Replenishment of the char at 12-hour intervals suppressed oxidation, whereas, continuous runs of 50 and 96 hours enabled oxidation of the sulfides to occur with much reduced rates compared to those measured with char replenishment. Large quantities of char (20 gms/sample) caused the formation of thick sulfide scales which were continuous to the substrate by a grain boundary network of the same sulfide. Comparison of the weight gains obtained in 96 hours for Inconel 671 when the char was replenished every twelve hours to those obtained on the IITRI/MPC program in a coal gasifier atmosphere (CGA) showed that corrosion in char was approximately 200 times more rapid than in OGA.« less
  • Six alloys, 310 stainless steel, Hastelloy X, Inconel 671, Incoloy 800, Haynes 188, and FeCrAlY (GE1541 and MA956), were corroded in two chars at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F. The chars, FMC and Husky, contained 2.7 and 0.9% sulfur, respectively. Various parameters were investigated, including char size, cover gas, char quantity, char replenishment period, gas composition, and the use of coatings. The corrosion process was strictly sulfidation when the char was replenished every 24 hours or less. The kinetics of reaction were nearly linear with time. The reaction resulted in thick external sulfide scales with extensive internal sulfidation in the substrate.more » The kinetics and reaction-product morphologies suggested that diffusion through the sulfide scale played a minor role and that an interfacial reaction was the rate-controlling step. A mathematical model was developed which supported this hypothesis. The reaction rates showed a relatively minor role on alloy composition, depending upon whether the alloys were tested singularly or in combination with others. Inconel 671, the best alloy in CGA environments, consistently corroded the most rapidly of the chromia-former types regardless of char sulfur content or of the temperature. Type 310 stainless was marginally better than Inconel 671. Incoloy 800 was intermediate, whereas, Haynes 188 and Hastelloy X exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The FeCrAlY alloys reacted very rapidly in the absence of preoxidation treatments. All alloys corroded in char at least 1000 times more rapidly than in the CGA (MPC-ITTRI) environment. None of the alloys will be acceptable for use in contact with char unless coatings are applied.« less
  • Five chromia-former alloys, Inconel 671, Hastelloy X, 310 stainless steel, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 188, have been exposed to both FMC char (2.7% S) and th Husky char (0.9% S) at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F for 96 hours. Inconel 671 and 310 stainless corroded the most rapidly, Haynes 188 and Hastelloy had the best corrosion resistance, and Incoloy 800 was intermediate. Corrosion in the higher sulfur char (FMC) was generally more severe than that in the lower sulfur char (Husky), although the more corrosion-resistant alloys (Haynes 188 and Hastelloy X) showed minimal differences from one char to another. Hastelloy Xmore » showed an unusual effect of temperature, the corrosion rate being higher at 1600 than at 1800/sup 0/F in FMC char. The effect of preoxidation on FeCrAlY was to retard corrosion. However, an incubation period was observed, during wich sulfur penetrated the alumina film, followed by linear corrosion kinetics. The beneficial effect increased with increasing film thickness up to a critical value, beyond which corrosion was greater than for thinner films. It is believed that mechanical breakdown of the film caused this effect. A coating of 63Al-33Cr-4Hf on Incoloy 800 markedly retarded corrosion in FMC char at 1800/sup 0/F. Protection was attributed to the formation of Cr/sub 2/S/sub 3/ and Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ in the reaction product. Corrosion in a mixture of H/sub 2/-10% H/sub 2/S at 950/sup 0/C (conditions giving a comparable sulfur activity as that in the FMC char at 1800/sup 0/F) was 6 times more rapid for Inconel 671 and over 3000 times more rapid for Hastelloy X. The scale structures were considerably different than those formed in char. 21 figures.« less