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Title: Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America

Abstract

The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882539
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-500-38044
TRN: US200612%%973
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; RELIABILITY; TEST FACILITIES; TESTING; WIND POWER INDUSTRY; WIND TURBINES; WIND ENERGY; BLADES; BLADE TEST FACILITY; NWTC; CRADA; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Cotrell, J., Musial, W., and Hughes, S. Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/882539.
Cotrell, J., Musial, W., & Hughes, S. Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America. United States. doi:10.2172/882539.
Cotrell, J., Musial, W., and Hughes, S. Mon . "Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America". United States. doi:10.2172/882539. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882539.
@article{osti_882539,
title = {Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America},
author = {Cotrell, J. and Musial, W. and Hughes, S.},
abstractNote = {The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.},
doi = {10.2172/882539},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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