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Title: Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

Abstract

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882473
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-540-39009
Journal ID: ISSN 0148--7191; TRN: US200614%%25
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 1; Related Information: SAE Paper No. 2006-01-0423; Posted with permission. Presented at the 2006 SAE World Congress, 3-6 April 2006, Detroit, Michigan
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DESULFURIZATION; NITROGEN OXIDES; CATALYSTS; EXHAUST GASES; DIESEL ENGINES; VEHICLES; ADSORPTION; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; EMISSION; NOX; NITROGEN OXIDE; NOX ADSORBER CATALYST; NAC; DIESEL PARTICLE FILTER; DPF; Transportation

Citation Formats

Tatur, M., Tomazic, D., Tyrer, H., Thornton, M., and Kubsh, J. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.4271/2006-01-0423.
Tatur, M., Tomazic, D., Tyrer, H., Thornton, M., & Kubsh, J. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System. United States. doi:10.4271/2006-01-0423.
Tatur, M., Tomazic, D., Tyrer, H., Thornton, M., and Kubsh, J. Mon . "Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System". United States. doi:10.4271/2006-01-0423. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882473.
@article{osti_882473,
title = {Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System},
author = {Tatur, M. and Tomazic, D. and Tyrer, H. and Thornton, M. and Kubsh, J.},
abstractNote = {Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.},
doi = {10.4271/2006-01-0423},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.
  • Due to its high efficiency and superior durability the diesel engine is again becoming a prime candidate for future light-duty vehicle applications within the United States. While in Europe the overall diesel share exceeds 40%, the current diesel share in the U.S. is 1%. Despite the current situation and the very stringent Tier 2 emission standards, efforts are being made to introduce the diesel engine back into the U.S. market. In order to succeed, these vehicles have to comply with emissions standards over a 120,000 miles distance while maintaining their excellent fuel economy. The availability of technologies such as high-pressure,more » common-rail fuel systems, low-sulfur diesel fuel, NO{sub x} adsorber catalysts (NAC), and diesel particle filters (DPFs) allow the development of powertrain systems that have the potential to comply with the light-duty Tier 2 emission requirements. In support of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has engaged in several test projects under the Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels - Diesel Emission Controls (APBF-DEC) activity. The primary technology being addressed by these projects are the sulfur tolerance and durability of the NAC/DPF system. The project investigated the performance of the emission control system and system desulphurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions. Emissions measurements were conducted over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), and the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET). Testing was conducted after the accumulation of 150 hours of engine operation calculated to be the equivalent of approximately 8,200 miles. For these evaluations three out of six of the FTP test cycles were within the 50,000-mile Tier 2 bin 5 emission standards (0.05 g/mi NO{sub x} and 0.01 g/mi PM). Emissions over the SC03 portion of the SFTP were within the 4,000-mile SFTP standards. The emission of NO{sub x}+NMHC exceeded the 4,000-mile standard over the US06 portion of the SFTP. Testing was also conducted after the accumulation of 1,000 hours of engine operation calculated to be the equivalent of approximately 50,000 miles. Recalibrated driveability maps resulted in more repeatable NOs{sub x} emissions from cycle to cycle. The NO{sub x} level was below the Tier 2 emission limits for 50,000 and 120,000 miles. NMHC emissions were found at a level outside the limit for 120,000 miles.« less
  • Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.
  • Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.
  • Sulfur poisoning from engine fuel and lube is one of the most recognizable degradation mechanisms of a NOx adsorber catalyst system for diesel emission reduction. Even with the availability of 15 ppm sulfur diesel fuel, NOx adsorber will be deactivated without an effective sulfur management. Two general pathways are currently being explored for sulfur management: (1) the use of a disposable SOx trap that can be replaced or rejuvenated offline periodically, and (2) the use of diesel fuel injection in the exhaust and high temperature de-sulfation approach to remove the sulfur poisons to recover the NOx trapping efficiency. The majormore » concern of the de-sulfation process is the many prolonged high temperature rich cycles that catalyst will encounter during its useful life. It is shown that NOx adsorber catalyst suffers some loss of its trapping capacity upon high temperature lean-rich exposure. With the use of a disposable SOx trap to remove large portion of the sulfur poisons from the exhaust, the NOx adsorber catalyst can be protected and the numbers of de-sulfation events can be greatly reduced. Spectroscopic techniques, such as DRIFTS and Raman, have been used to monitor the underlying chemical reactions during NOx trapping/ regeneration and de-sulfation periods, and provide a fundamental understanding of NOx storage capacity and catalyst degradation mechanism using model catalysts. This paper examines the sulfur effect on two model NOx adsorber catalysts. The chemistry of SOx/base metal oxides and the sulfation product pathways and their corresponding spectroscopic data are discussed. SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-3245 {copyright} 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.« less