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Title: Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications

Abstract

Electromagnetic waves centered at a frequency of 1 THz lie between photonics on the one hand and electronics on the other, and are very hard to generate and detect. However, since the THz part of the spectrum is energetically equivalent to many important physical, chemical and biological processes including superconducting gaps and protein dynamical processes, it is of great interest to facilitate experimental research in this region. This has stimulated major steps in the past decade for filling this gap in the usable spectrum. In this review paper we describe the evolution of a new generation of sources that boost the average power available in the THz region by more than a million-fold, making this region routinely accessible for the first time. This is achieved using two enhancement factors, namely relativistic electrons and super-radiance. We will also point to the scientific potential for discovery that is now enabled in this region.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
882457
Report Number(s):
JLAB-ACT-05-355; DOE/ER/40150-3877
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-4885; RPPHAG; TRN: US200614%%93
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84ER40150
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Reports on Progress in Physics; Journal Volume: 69
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTRONS; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Gwyn Williams. Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1088/0954-3899/32/5/006.
Gwyn Williams. Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications. United States. doi:10.1088/0954-3899/32/5/006.
Gwyn Williams. Wed . "Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications". United States. doi:10.1088/0954-3899/32/5/006. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882457.
@article{osti_882457,
title = {Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications},
author = {Gwyn Williams},
abstractNote = {Electromagnetic waves centered at a frequency of 1 THz lie between photonics on the one hand and electronics on the other, and are very hard to generate and detect. However, since the THz part of the spectrum is energetically equivalent to many important physical, chemical and biological processes including superconducting gaps and protein dynamical processes, it is of great interest to facilitate experimental research in this region. This has stimulated major steps in the past decade for filling this gap in the usable spectrum. In this review paper we describe the evolution of a new generation of sources that boost the average power available in the THz region by more than a million-fold, making this region routinely accessible for the first time. This is achieved using two enhancement factors, namely relativistic electrons and super-radiance. We will also point to the scientific potential for discovery that is now enabled in this region.},
doi = {10.1088/0954-3899/32/5/006},
journal = {Reports on Progress in Physics},
number = ,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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