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Title: Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands

Abstract

This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminatedmore » through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stephen F. Austin State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882290
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-00NT40931
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CARBON SINKS; FORESTS; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; MANUALS

Citation Formats

Gary Kronrad. Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/882290.
Gary Kronrad. Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands. United States. doi:10.2172/882290.
Gary Kronrad. Tue . "Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands". United States. doi:10.2172/882290. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882290.
@article{osti_882290,
title = {Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands},
author = {Gary Kronrad},
abstractNote = {This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminated through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.},
doi = {10.2172/882290},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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