skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements

Abstract

Previous bacterial transport studies have shown decreased bacterial adhesion with transport distance, largely based on laboratory core experiments. An inferred effect of microbial population variability is invoked to interpret experimental data, but there lacks direct measurement at field-scale, especially in correlation of transport distance with change of bacterial surface properties. This study was undertaken to determine change of collision efficiency with transport distance, taking advantage of the bacterial transport experiment in Oyster, VA in the summer of 2001. Upon injection of an adhesion deficient strain, Comamonas sp. DA001 into a up-gradient well, bacterial samples were taken from multi-level samplers along the flow path, and were injected into cores of 40 cm in length and 7.5 cm in diameter packed with homogenized sediment from the same site, South Oyster focus area (SOFA). Bacterial suspension samples were also measured for bacterial electrophoretic mobility distribution. Using filtration theory, collision efficiency, the probability of bacterial attachment to the grain surfaces upon collision and a quantitative measure of bacterial adhesion, was determined using CXTFIT model fitted attachment rate, measured grain size (10th percentile), porosity, flow velocity, and collector efficiency. Collision efficiency was also determined based on the fraction of retention in the cores. Contrary tomore » previous results and interpretation of field-scale breakthrough curves, our experimentally determined collision efficiency increases with transport distance in the core experiments, which correlates with increasingly negative surface charge of the injected bacteria. Therefore we conclude that the apparent decrease in adhesion with transport distance in the field is strongly controlled by field-scale heterogeneity in physical and chemical aquifer properties and not by microbial population heterogeneity.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882098
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-37865
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-467X; GRWAAP; KP1301010; TRN: US200613%%591
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ground Water, 44(3):415-429; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ADHESION; AQUIFERS; BACTERIA; DISTRIBUTION; EFFICIENCY; FILTRATION; GRAIN SIZE; POROSITY; PROBABILITY; RETENTION; SAMPLERS; SEDIMENTS; SURFACE PROPERTIES; TRANSPORT; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Dong, Hailiang, Scheibe, Timothy D., Johnson, William P., Monkman, Crystal, and Fuller, Mark E.. Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6584.2005.00133.x.
Dong, Hailiang, Scheibe, Timothy D., Johnson, William P., Monkman, Crystal, & Fuller, Mark E.. Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6584.2005.00133.x.
Dong, Hailiang, Scheibe, Timothy D., Johnson, William P., Monkman, Crystal, and Fuller, Mark E.. Mon . "Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6584.2005.00133.x.
@article{osti_882098,
title = {Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements},
author = {Dong, Hailiang and Scheibe, Timothy D. and Johnson, William P. and Monkman, Crystal and Fuller, Mark E.},
abstractNote = {Previous bacterial transport studies have shown decreased bacterial adhesion with transport distance, largely based on laboratory core experiments. An inferred effect of microbial population variability is invoked to interpret experimental data, but there lacks direct measurement at field-scale, especially in correlation of transport distance with change of bacterial surface properties. This study was undertaken to determine change of collision efficiency with transport distance, taking advantage of the bacterial transport experiment in Oyster, VA in the summer of 2001. Upon injection of an adhesion deficient strain, Comamonas sp. DA001 into a up-gradient well, bacterial samples were taken from multi-level samplers along the flow path, and were injected into cores of 40 cm in length and 7.5 cm in diameter packed with homogenized sediment from the same site, South Oyster focus area (SOFA). Bacterial suspension samples were also measured for bacterial electrophoretic mobility distribution. Using filtration theory, collision efficiency, the probability of bacterial attachment to the grain surfaces upon collision and a quantitative measure of bacterial adhesion, was determined using CXTFIT model fitted attachment rate, measured grain size (10th percentile), porosity, flow velocity, and collector efficiency. Collision efficiency was also determined based on the fraction of retention in the cores. Contrary to previous results and interpretation of field-scale breakthrough curves, our experimentally determined collision efficiency increases with transport distance in the core experiments, which correlates with increasingly negative surface charge of the injected bacteria. Therefore we conclude that the apparent decrease in adhesion with transport distance in the field is strongly controlled by field-scale heterogeneity in physical and chemical aquifer properties and not by microbial population heterogeneity.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1745-6584.2005.00133.x},
journal = {Ground Water, 44(3):415-429},
number = 3,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • The spin-polarized radical pairs P{sub 865}{sup {center_dot}+}Q{sub A}{sup {center_dot}-} in protonated and deuterated Zn-substituted reaction centers from two different mutants of the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and P{sub 700}{sup {center_dot}+}A{sub 1}{sup {center_dot}-} in plant photosystem I from Synechococcus elongatus are investigated by pulsed EPR spectroscopy. Spin-polarized radical pairs give rise to a characteristic out-of-phase electron spin echo. This echo shows a deep envelope modulation with a frequency governed by the spin-spin interaction. The known distance dependence of the magnetic dipolar interaction allows the determination of the distance between the cofactors carrying the unpaired electron spins. For the bacterial reaction centersmore » this distance is known for the electronic ground state from crystal structures and is compared here with the distance of the radical pair spins, i.e. the charge-separated state. In photosystem I the location of the acceptor A{sub 1} is not known yet. A distance of 25.4 {+-} 0.3 angstrom between P{sub 700}{sup {center_dot}+} and A{sub 1}{sup {center_dot}-} is obtained here and gives new structural information on photosystem I. 42 refs., 6 figs.« less
  • We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) andmore » second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.« less
  • The bacterial alarmone 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate (AICAR triphosphate or ZTP), derived from the monophosphorylated purine precursor ZMP, accumulates during folate starvation. ZTP regulates genes involved in purine and folate metabolism through a cognate riboswitch. The linker connecting this riboswitch's two subdomains varies in length by over 100 nucleotides. In this paper, we report the cocrystal structure of the Fusobacterium ulcerans riboswitch bound to ZMP, which spans the two subdomains whose interface also comprises a pseudoknot and ribose zipper. The riboswitch recognizes the carboxamide oxygen of ZMP through an unprecedented inner-sphere coordination with a Mg 2+ ion. We show that themore » affinity of the riboswitch for ZMP is modulated by the linker length. Notably, ZMP can simultaneously bind to the two subdomains even when they are synthesized as separate RNAs. Finally, the ZTP riboswitch demonstrates how specific small-molecule binding can drive association of distant noncoding-RNA domains to regulate gene expression.« less