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Title: Second-Generation PFBC Systems R&D

Abstract

No work was performed; the two remaining Multi Annular Swirl Burner test campaigns are on hold pending selection of a new test facility (replacement for the shut down UTSI burner test facility) and identification of associated testing costs. The Second-Generation PFB Combustion Plant conceptual design prepared in 1987 is being updated to reflect the benefit of pilot plant test data and the latest advances in gas turbine technology. The updated plant is being designed to operate with 95 percent sulfur capture and a single Siemens Westinghouse (SW) 501G gas turbine. Using carbonizer and gas turbine data generated by Foster Wheeler (FW) and SW respectively, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology prepared preliminary plant heat and material balances based on carbonizer operating temperatures of 1700 and 1800 F and found the former to yield the higher plant efficiency. As a result, 1700 F has been selected as the preferred operating condition for the carbonizer. The 501G gas turbine has an air compressor discharge temperature of 811EF and an exhaust temperature of 1140 F. Both of these streams represent high sources of heat and must be cooled, the air to 600 F to be compatible with a 650 F PCFB pressure vessel design temperaturemore » and the exhaust for a 275 F stack gas temperature. Because of their relatively high temperature, they can be used for feed water heating, steam generation and/or steam superheating and reheating. As a result, the plant could have one boiler (the PCFB boiler), or as many as three boilers if their cooling is used to generate steam. If the two streams are used to heat feed water, the feed water flow must be increased to absorb this heat while staying below the boiling point, and the steam turbine output increases; this decreases both the gas turbine to steam turbine power ratio and plant efficiency. If the feed water flow is reduced, these streams are used for steam generation and superheating; the steam throughput/output decreases and plant efficiency is maximized. Three different plant arrangements using one, two and then three boilers were considered. After reviewing the three arrangements it was felt the operating complexity associated with a three-boiler plant did not justify the 1/2 point increase in plant efficiency it provided and a two-boiler plant was selected.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Foster Wheeler Development Corporation
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
882014
DOE Contract Number:  
AC21-86MC21023
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS; BURNERS; EFFICIENCY; GAS TURBINES; PILOT PLANTS; STEAM GENERATION; SULFUR; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; DESIGN

Citation Formats

Archie Robertson. Second-Generation PFBC Systems R&D. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/882014.
Archie Robertson. Second-Generation PFBC Systems R&D. United States. doi:10.2172/882014.
Archie Robertson. Sun . "Second-Generation PFBC Systems R&D". United States. doi:10.2172/882014. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/882014.
@article{osti_882014,
title = {Second-Generation PFBC Systems R&D},
author = {Archie Robertson},
abstractNote = {No work was performed; the two remaining Multi Annular Swirl Burner test campaigns are on hold pending selection of a new test facility (replacement for the shut down UTSI burner test facility) and identification of associated testing costs. The Second-Generation PFB Combustion Plant conceptual design prepared in 1987 is being updated to reflect the benefit of pilot plant test data and the latest advances in gas turbine technology. The updated plant is being designed to operate with 95 percent sulfur capture and a single Siemens Westinghouse (SW) 501G gas turbine. Using carbonizer and gas turbine data generated by Foster Wheeler (FW) and SW respectively, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology prepared preliminary plant heat and material balances based on carbonizer operating temperatures of 1700 and 1800 F and found the former to yield the higher plant efficiency. As a result, 1700 F has been selected as the preferred operating condition for the carbonizer. The 501G gas turbine has an air compressor discharge temperature of 811EF and an exhaust temperature of 1140 F. Both of these streams represent high sources of heat and must be cooled, the air to 600 F to be compatible with a 650 F PCFB pressure vessel design temperature and the exhaust for a 275 F stack gas temperature. Because of their relatively high temperature, they can be used for feed water heating, steam generation and/or steam superheating and reheating. As a result, the plant could have one boiler (the PCFB boiler), or as many as three boilers if their cooling is used to generate steam. If the two streams are used to heat feed water, the feed water flow must be increased to absorb this heat while staying below the boiling point, and the steam turbine output increases; this decreases both the gas turbine to steam turbine power ratio and plant efficiency. If the feed water flow is reduced, these streams are used for steam generation and superheating; the steam throughput/output decreases and plant efficiency is maximized. Three different plant arrangements using one, two and then three boilers were considered. After reviewing the three arrangements it was felt the operating complexity associated with a three-boiler plant did not justify the 1/2 point increase in plant efficiency it provided and a two-boiler plant was selected.},
doi = {10.2172/882014},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {4}
}