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Title: National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The University of Kansas Center for Research Inc.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
881977
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-00NT40936
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Timothy R. Carr. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb). United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/881977.
Timothy R. Carr. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb). United States. doi:10.2172/881977.
Timothy R. Carr. Tue . "National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)". United States. doi:10.2172/881977. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/881977.
@article{osti_881977,
title = {National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)},
author = {Timothy R. Carr},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.2172/881977},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This annual report describes progress in the third year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. The project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project has been extended and expanded as a ''NATional CARBon Sequestration Databasemore » and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)'' to provide national coverage across the Regional CO{sub 2} Partnerships, which currently cover 40 states (http://www.natcarb.org). Advanced distributed computing solutions link database servers across the five states and other publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS) into a single system where data is maintained and enhanced at the local level but is accessed and assembled through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. This project has improved the flow of data across servers and increased the amount and quality of available digital data. The online tools used in the project have improved in stability and speed in order to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The move away from direct database access to web access through eXtensible Markup Language (XML) has increased stability and security while decreasing management overhead. The MIDCARB viewer has been simplified to provide improved display and organization of the more than 125 layers and data tables that have been generated as part of the project. The MIDCARB project is a functional demonstration of distributed management of data systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas. The MIDCARB system addresses CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.« less
  • This report provides a brief summary of the milestone for Quarter 1 of 2006 of the NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) This milestone assigns consistent symbology to the ''National CO{sub 2} Facilities'' GIS layer on the NATCARB website. As a default, CO{sub 2} sources provided by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships and the National Group are now all one symbol type. In addition for sinks such as oil and gas fields where data is drawn from multiple partnerships, the symbology is given a single color. All these modifications are accomplished as the layer is passed throughmore » the national portal (www.natcarb.org). This documentation is sent to National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a Topical Report and will be included in the next Annual Report.« less
  • This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinatedmore » regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is ending, NatCarb will continue as an internal US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) project with the continued cooperation of personnel at both West Virginia University and the Kansas Geological Survey. The successor project will continue to organize and enhance the information about CO{sub 2} sources and developing the technology needed to access, query, analyze, display, and distribute natural resource data critical to carbon management. Data are generated, maintained and enhanced locally at the RCSP level, or at the national level in specialized data warehouses, and assembled, accessed, and analyzed in real-time through a single geoportal. To address the broader needs of a spectrum of users form high-end technical queries to the general public, NatCarb will be moving to an improved and simplified display for the general public using readily available web tools such as Google Earth{trademark} and Google Maps{trademark}. The goal is for NatCarb to expand in terms of technology and areal coverage and remain the premier functional demonstration of distributed data-management systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas, and forms the foundation of a functioning carbon cyber-infrastructure. NatCarb provides access to first-order information to evaluate the costs, economic potential and societal issues of CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including public perception and regulatory aspects.« less
  • At the request of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration, and with the cooperation of the Safety and Environmental Protection and Plant Engineering Divisions, a Geographic Information System (GIS) Task Group has undertaken an effort to identify the data requirements, potential applications, and computing environment within which an integrated GIS could be implemented to meet the environmental and facilities management needs of the Laboratory. The Task Group held discussions with the three participating groups and with Laboratory officials. Software and hardware vendors were invited to demonstrate their products to all participants using BNL data, and private consultants discussedmore » their GIS and database applications. After considering the needs of the three groups and other general implementation concerns, a list of ten requirements for a BNL site-wide GIS has been determined. On the basis of these considerations, three conceptual models for an integrated GIS are defined. These include a highly centralized system, a fully distributed system, and a composite model. The models differ in their allocation of responsibility for data management, applications development and GIS analysis, and local user support. Several issues remain to be resolved before an integrated GIS for the three operational groups can be fully implemented.« less