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Title: Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint

Abstract

This paper analyzes the potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) to be deployed on a very large scale and provide a large fraction of a system's electricity. It explicitly examines how the hourly availability of PV interacts with the limited flexibility of traditional electricity generation plants. The authors found that, under high penetration levels and existing grid-operation procedures and rules, the system will have excess PV generation during certain periods of the year. This excess PV generation results in increased costs, which can increase dramatically when PV provides on the order of 10%-15% of total electricity demand in systems that are heavily dependent on inflexible baseload steam plants. Measures to increase penetration of PV are also discussed, including increased system flexibility, increased dispatchable load, and energy storage.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
881919
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-620-39683
TRN: US200613%%193
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at Solar 2006, 8-13 July 2006, Denver, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AVAILABILITY; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY STORAGE; FLEXIBILITY; STEAM; SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS; PV; LARGE-SCALE PV; DEPLOYMENT; GRID-CONNECTED PV; SOLAR PV; CARBON EMISSIONS; PV SYSTEM; PV GENERATION; HOMER; AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY; ASES; SOLAR 2006; Energy Analysis

Citation Formats

Denholm, P., and Margolis, R. Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Denholm, P., & Margolis, R. Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint. United States.
Denholm, P., and Margolis, R. Sat . "Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/881919.
@article{osti_881919,
title = {Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint},
author = {Denholm, P. and Margolis, R.},
abstractNote = {This paper analyzes the potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) to be deployed on a very large scale and provide a large fraction of a system's electricity. It explicitly examines how the hourly availability of PV interacts with the limited flexibility of traditional electricity generation plants. The authors found that, under high penetration levels and existing grid-operation procedures and rules, the system will have excess PV generation during certain periods of the year. This excess PV generation results in increased costs, which can increase dramatically when PV provides on the order of 10%-15% of total electricity demand in systems that are heavily dependent on inflexible baseload steam plants. Measures to increase penetration of PV are also discussed, including increased system flexibility, increased dispatchable load, and energy storage.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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