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Title: EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.

Abstract

The workshop's main objectives are (1) to present the emerging modalities for analyzing carbon in soil, (2) to assess their error propagation, (3) to recommend new protocols and sampling strategies for the new instrumentation, and, (4) to compare the costs of the new methods with traditional chemical ones.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/SC
OSTI Identifier:
881571
Report Number(s):
BNL-75762-2006
R&D Project: EE-536-EEDA; KP1202020; TRN: US200612%%884
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON; ECONOMICS; SAMPLING; SOILS; STATISTICS; ANTHROPOGENIC CO2, INSTRUMENTATION, MODELING, IN SITU CARBON CONTENT OF SOILS

Citation Formats

WIELOPOLSKI, L. EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/881571.
WIELOPOLSKI, L. EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.. United States. doi:10.2172/881571.
WIELOPOLSKI, L. Sat . "EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.". United States. doi:10.2172/881571. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/881571.
@article{osti_881571,
title = {EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.},
author = {WIELOPOLSKI, L.},
abstractNote = {The workshop's main objectives are (1) to present the emerging modalities for analyzing carbon in soil, (2) to assess their error propagation, (3) to recommend new protocols and sampling strategies for the new instrumentation, and, (4) to compare the costs of the new methods with traditional chemical ones.},
doi = {10.2172/881571},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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