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Title: Moduli Decays and Gravitinos

Abstract

One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inaton decay.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
881532
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-11805
hep-ph/0604140; TRN: US0603024
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMOLOGY; DECAY; HELICITY; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; UNIVERSE; Phenomenology-HEP,HEPPH

Citation Formats

Dine, Michael, Kitano, Ryuichiro, Morisse, Alexander, and Shirman, Yuri. Moduli Decays and Gravitinos. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/881532.
Dine, Michael, Kitano, Ryuichiro, Morisse, Alexander, & Shirman, Yuri. Moduli Decays and Gravitinos. United States. doi:10.2172/881532.
Dine, Michael, Kitano, Ryuichiro, Morisse, Alexander, and Shirman, Yuri. Fri . "Moduli Decays and Gravitinos". United States. doi:10.2172/881532. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/881532.
@article{osti_881532,
title = {Moduli Decays and Gravitinos},
author = {Dine, Michael and Kitano, Ryuichiro and Morisse, Alexander and Shirman, Yuri},
abstractNote = {One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inaton decay.},
doi = {10.2172/881532},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the Universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inflaton decay.
  • In attempts to simultaneously have galaxy formation with adiabatic fluctuations, dark galactic halos and a critical ..cap omega.. = 1, recent models have been proposed with a heavy (cold) species which decays and a lighten (hot or warm) one which is stable. Surprisingly enough, these models are very constraining. Independent of the particle physics model, the decay width of the heavy particle must be 0(10/sup -40/) GeV. Such a scale is only natural in theories involving gravity where one expects GAMMA - M/sub H//sup 3//M/sub p//sup 2/, where M/sub H/ is the mass of the heavy particle and M/sub p/more » is the planck mass. In this paper, we suggest that the heavy particle might be the gravitino which is present in all supergravity theories. This model would then require that the gravitino decay products not include photons, indicating that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) must be something other than the photino. An acceptable candidate for the LSP might be the axino, the supersymmetric partner of the axion.« less
  • This report focuses on tests performed on sandstones and shales from four wells in the Mesaverde formation. A previous document showed a comparison of the static and dynamic laboratory moduli. This document describes how field velocity logs were used to derive field dynamic moduli. A 3-way comparison was performed for these stiffness properties; the results show no agreement between the three sets of values. Differences between dynamic stiffness coefficients from the field and the laboratory exceed 200%; differences between static and dynamic coefficients range up to 600%. In turn, this indicated that a reliable method of estimating mechanical rock propertiesmore » for hydraulic fracturing design has not been established, and that such a task should be pursued. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • This report contains the laboratory test procedures, graphical representations of the raw data, and test results for the Detten Well No. 1 (Chapters 1 and 2), G. Friemel Well No. 1 (Chapters 3 and 4), Mansfield Well No. 1 (Chapters 5 and 6), and Zeech Well No. 1 (Chapters 7 and 8) in the Permian Basin, Texas. The laboratory tests were performed for static moduli, dynamic moduli, uniaxial compressive strength, and triaxial compressive strength determinations. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated.