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Title: Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring

Abstract

At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
879067
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-06-036-AD
TRN: US0701132
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH03000
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; HEATING; IONIZATION; LIFETIME; LIFETIME EXTENSION; MUONS; NEUTRONS; PRODUCTION; PROTONS; STORAGE RINGS; Accelerators, Instrumentation

Citation Formats

Neuffer, David V., and /Fermilab. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Neuffer, David V., & /Fermilab. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring. United States.
Neuffer, David V., and /Fermilab. Wed . "Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/879067.
@article{osti_879067,
title = {Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring},
author = {Neuffer, David V. and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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