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Title: What can gamma ray bursts teach us about dark energy?

Abstract

It has been suggested that Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) may enable the expansion rate of our Universe to be measured out to very high redshifts (z {approx}> 5) just as type Ia supernovae have done at z {approx} 1-1.5. We explore this possibility here, and find that GRB have the potential to detect dark energy at high statistical significance, but they are unlikely to be competitive with future supernovae missions, such as SNAP, in measuring the properties of the dark energy. The exception to this conclusion is if there is appreciable dark energy at early times, in which case the information from GRB's will provide an excellent complement to the z {approx} 1 information from supernovae.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
878920
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-05-532-A
arXiv eprint number astro-ph/0512232; TRN: US200706%%405
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH03000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astropart.Phys.27:113-118,2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASTROPHYSICS; SUPERNOVAE; UNIVERSE; Astrophysics

Citation Formats

Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Dodelson, Scott, and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.. What can gamma ray bursts teach us about dark energy?. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Dodelson, Scott, & /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.. What can gamma ray bursts teach us about dark energy?. United States.
Hooper, Dan, /Fermilab, Dodelson, Scott, and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.. Thu . "What can gamma ray bursts teach us about dark energy?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/878920.
@article{osti_878920,
title = {What can gamma ray bursts teach us about dark energy?},
author = {Hooper, Dan and /Fermilab and Dodelson, Scott and /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.},
abstractNote = {It has been suggested that Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) may enable the expansion rate of our Universe to be measured out to very high redshifts (z {approx}> 5) just as type Ia supernovae have done at z {approx} 1-1.5. We explore this possibility here, and find that GRB have the potential to detect dark energy at high statistical significance, but they are unlikely to be competitive with future supernovae missions, such as SNAP, in measuring the properties of the dark energy. The exception to this conclusion is if there is appreciable dark energy at early times, in which case the information from GRB's will provide an excellent complement to the z {approx} 1 information from supernovae.},
doi = {},
journal = {Astropart.Phys.27:113-118,2007},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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