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Title: Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program

Abstract

The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
878918
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-05-540-AD
TRN: US0700924
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH03000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conf.Proc.842:1061-1063,2006; Conference: Presented at Particles and Nuclei International Conference (PANIC 05), Santa Fe, New Mexico, 24-28 Oct 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; COMMISSIONING; NUCLEI; PERFORMANCE; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; Accelerators

Citation Formats

Syphers, M.J., and /Fermilab. Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Syphers, M.J., & /Fermilab. Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program. United States.
Syphers, M.J., and /Fermilab. Thu . "Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/878918.
@article{osti_878918,
title = {Continuing u.s. participation in the lhc accelerator program},
author = {Syphers, M.J. and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIP Conf.Proc.842:1061-1063,2006},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.
  • No abstract prepared.
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  • The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW). Because a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians will be needed to conduct the investigations of science and technology for transmutation, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project.