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Title: Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.

Abstract

This report gives a description of several types of wireless, unpowered remote sensors. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were coupled with conventional sensors to create entirely new types of sensors. These sensors report physically measurable data in the same manner as the conventional sensors, but they do it remotely and without any local power source. The sensors are measured remotely using a radar-like interrogation device, and the sensors and their related communication electronics draw all of the power needed for communicating from the radar pulse. The report covers only a description of prototype sensors and not of the manufacturing requirements of these devices.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
878576
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-1288
TRN: US200611%%244
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; REMOTE SENSING; MONITORS; ACOUSTICS; NASA; RADAR; POWER SUPPLIES; DATA TRANSMISSION; DESIGN; Acoustic surface wave devices.; Remote sensing.

Citation Formats

Brocato, Robert Wesley. Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/878576.
Brocato, Robert Wesley. Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.. United States. doi:10.2172/878576.
Brocato, Robert Wesley. Wed . "Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.". United States. doi:10.2172/878576. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/878576.
@article{osti_878576,
title = {Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.},
author = {Brocato, Robert Wesley},
abstractNote = {This report gives a description of several types of wireless, unpowered remote sensors. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were coupled with conventional sensors to create entirely new types of sensors. These sensors report physically measurable data in the same manner as the conventional sensors, but they do it remotely and without any local power source. The sensors are measured remotely using a radar-like interrogation device, and the sensors and their related communication electronics draw all of the power needed for communicating from the radar pulse. The report covers only a description of prototype sensors and not of the manufacturing requirements of these devices.},
doi = {10.2172/878576},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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