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Title: Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos

Abstract

This report presents a summary of the results from R&D conducted as a feasibility study in the Department of Physics of Brown University for detection of low energy solar neutrinos utilizing a superfluid helium target. The report outlines the results in several areas: 1) development of experimental facilities, 2) energy deposition by electrons and alphas in superfluid helium, 3) development of wafer and metallic magnetic calorimeters, 4) background studies, 5) coded apertures and conceptual design, 6) Detection of single electrons and 7) a simulation of expected performance of a full scale device. Recommendations for possible future work are also presented. A bibliography of published papers and unpublished doctoral theses is included.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brown University, Providence, RI
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
878465
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/40452
TRN: US200712%%300
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-88ER40452
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; APERTURES; CALORIMETERS; DESIGN; DETECTION; ELECTRONS; HELIUM; PERFORMANCE; PHYSICS; RECOMMENDATIONS; SIMULATION; SOLAR NEUTRINOS; solar neutrinos, superfluid helium, coded aperture, low energy neutrinos

Citation Formats

Lanou, Robert E., Jr. Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/878465.
Lanou, Robert E., Jr. Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos. United States. doi:10.2172/878465.
Lanou, Robert E., Jr. Fri . "Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos". United States. doi:10.2172/878465. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/878465.
@article{osti_878465,
title = {Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos},
author = {Lanou, Robert E., Jr.},
abstractNote = {This report presents a summary of the results from R&D conducted as a feasibility study in the Department of Physics of Brown University for detection of low energy solar neutrinos utilizing a superfluid helium target. The report outlines the results in several areas: 1) development of experimental facilities, 2) energy deposition by electrons and alphas in superfluid helium, 3) development of wafer and metallic magnetic calorimeters, 4) background studies, 5) coded apertures and conceptual design, 6) Detection of single electrons and 7) a simulation of expected performance of a full scale device. Recommendations for possible future work are also presented. A bibliography of published papers and unpublished doctoral theses is included.},
doi = {10.2172/878465},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • We report measurements of the distribution of rotons generated by {alpha} particles interacting in a bath of superfluid helium. The roton flux is found to be anisotropic; it is about 4 times larger transverse to the track direction than along it. This asymmetry may provide a powerful tool in particle and astrophysics experiments where sensitivity to low energy recoil track direction is important.
  • This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports day light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of day lighting and fluorescent lighting for office lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. The secondary mirror consists of eight planar-segmented mirrors that direct the visiblemore » part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic array to produce electricity. This report describes eleven investigations on various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm the technical feasibility of this technology.« less
  • This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports day light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of day lighting and fluorescent lighting for office lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. The secondary mirror consists of eight planar-segmented mirrors that direct the visiblemore » part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic array to produce electricity. This report emphasizes the design of the thermophotovoltaic receiver and the whole system simulation model.« less
  • This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports day light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of day lighting and fluorescent lighting for office lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. The secondary mirror consists of eight planar-segmented mirrors that direct the visiblemore » part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic array to produce electricity. This report describes several investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility of this technology.« less
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