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Title: Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments

Abstract

This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10{sup 8} rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10{sup 9} rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences inmore » total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
8783
Report Number(s):
SAND99-1727J
TRN: US0102663
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science; Other Information: Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science; PBD: 7 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DESIGN; RADIATION HARDENING; LIFE-CYCLE COST; MICROELECTRONICS; DOSE RATES

Citation Formats

Winokur, P.S., Lum, G.K., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sexton, F.W., Hash, G.L., and Scott, L.. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1109/23.819113.
Winokur, P.S., Lum, G.K., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sexton, F.W., Hash, G.L., & Scott, L.. Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments. United States. doi:10.1109/23.819113.
Winokur, P.S., Lum, G.K., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sexton, F.W., Hash, G.L., and Scott, L.. Wed . "Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments". United States. doi:10.1109/23.819113. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/8783.
@article{osti_8783,
title = {Use of COTS [commercial-off-the-shelf] Microelectronics in Radiation Environments},
author = {Winokur, P.S. and Lum, G.K. and Shaneyfelt, M.R. and Sexton, F.W. and Hash, G.L. and Scott, L.},
abstractNote = {This paper addresses key issues for the cost-effective use of COTS microelectronics in radiation environments that enable circuit or system designers to manage risks and ensure mission success. COTS parts with low radiation tolerance should not be used when they degrade mission critical functions or lead to premature system failure. We review several factors and tradeoffs affecting the successful application of COTS parts including (1) hardness assurance and qualification issues, (2) system hardening techniques, and (3) life-cycle costs. The paper also describes several experimental studies that address trends in total-dose, transient, and single-event radiation hardness as COTS technology scales to smaller feature sizes. As an example, the level at which dose-rate upset occurs in Samsung SRAMS increases from 1.4x10{sup 8} rads(Si)/s for a 256K SRAM to 7.7x10{sup 9} rads(Si)/s for a 4M SRAM, indicating unintentional hardening improvements in the design or process of a commercial technology. Additional experiments were performed to quantify variations in radiation hardness for COTS parts. In one study, only small (10-15%) variations were found in the dose-rate upset and latchup thresholds for Samsung 4M SRAMS from three different date codes. In another study, irradiations of 4M SRAMS from Samsung, Hitachi, and Toshiba indicate large differences in total-dose radiation hardness. The paper attempts to carefully define terms and clear up misunderstandings about the definitions of ''COTS'' and ''radiation-hardened'' technology.},
doi = {10.1109/23.819113},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 07 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Wed Jul 07 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}