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Title: Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report

Abstract

Nitrate is the number one drinking water contaminant in the United States. It is pervasive in surface and groundwater systems,and its principal anthropogenic sources have increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In California alone, one third of the public drinking-water wells has been lost since 1988 and nitrate contamination is the most common reason for abandonment. Effective nitrate management in groundwater is complicated by uncertainties related to multiple point and non-point sources, hydrogeologic complexity, geochemical reactivity, and quantification of denitrification processes. In this paper, we review an integrated experimental and simulation-based framework being developed to study the fate of nitrate in a 25 km-long groundwater subbasin south of San Jose, California, a historically agricultural area now undergoing rapid urbanization with increasing demands for groundwater. The modeling approach is driven by a need to integrate new and archival data that support the hypothesis that nitrate fate and transport at the basin scale is intricately related to hydrostratigraphic complexity, variability of flow paths and groundwater residence times, microbial activity, and multiple geochemical reaction mechanisms. This study synthesizes these disparate and multi-scale data into a three-dimensional and highly resolved reactive transport modeling framework.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
878204
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-219675
TRN: US0602300
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY; CALIFORNIA; CONTAMINATION; DENITRIFICATION; DRINKING WATER; HYPOTHESIS; MANAGEMENT; NITRATES; REACTION KINETICS; SIMULATION; TRANSPORT; GROUND WATER

Citation Formats

Esser, B K, Beller, H, Carle, S, Cey, B, Hudson, G B, Leif, R, LeTain, T, Moody-Bartel, C, Moore, K, McNab, W, Moran, J, and Tompson, A. Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/878204.
Esser, B K, Beller, H, Carle, S, Cey, B, Hudson, G B, Leif, R, LeTain, T, Moody-Bartel, C, Moore, K, McNab, W, Moran, J, & Tompson, A. Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/878204.
Esser, B K, Beller, H, Carle, S, Cey, B, Hudson, G B, Leif, R, LeTain, T, Moody-Bartel, C, Moore, K, McNab, W, Moran, J, and Tompson, A. Fri . "Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/878204. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/878204.
@article{osti_878204,
title = {Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report},
author = {Esser, B K and Beller, H and Carle, S and Cey, B and Hudson, G B and Leif, R and LeTain, T and Moody-Bartel, C and Moore, K and McNab, W and Moran, J and Tompson, A},
abstractNote = {Nitrate is the number one drinking water contaminant in the United States. It is pervasive in surface and groundwater systems,and its principal anthropogenic sources have increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In California alone, one third of the public drinking-water wells has been lost since 1988 and nitrate contamination is the most common reason for abandonment. Effective nitrate management in groundwater is complicated by uncertainties related to multiple point and non-point sources, hydrogeologic complexity, geochemical reactivity, and quantification of denitrification processes. In this paper, we review an integrated experimental and simulation-based framework being developed to study the fate of nitrate in a 25 km-long groundwater subbasin south of San Jose, California, a historically agricultural area now undergoing rapid urbanization with increasing demands for groundwater. The modeling approach is driven by a need to integrate new and archival data that support the hypothesis that nitrate fate and transport at the basin scale is intricately related to hydrostratigraphic complexity, variability of flow paths and groundwater residence times, microbial activity, and multiple geochemical reaction mechanisms. This study synthesizes these disparate and multi-scale data into a three-dimensional and highly resolved reactive transport modeling framework.},
doi = {10.2172/878204},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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