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Title: X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters

Abstract

We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877981
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-11652
astro-ph/0512549; TRN: US200702%%245
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; GALAXIES; RADIATIVE COOLING; RESOLUTION; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; Astrophysics,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Peterson, John R., /KIPAC, Menlo Park, Fabian, A.C., and /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/877981.
Peterson, John R., /KIPAC, Menlo Park, Fabian, A.C., & /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters. United States. doi:10.2172/877981.
Peterson, John R., /KIPAC, Menlo Park, Fabian, A.C., and /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. Fri . "X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters". United States. doi:10.2172/877981. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/877981.
@article{osti_877981,
title = {X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters},
author = {Peterson, John R. and /KIPAC, Menlo Park and Fabian, A.C. and /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.},
abstractNote = {We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.},
doi = {10.2172/877981},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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