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Title: Training honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (University of Montana, Missula, MT)
  2. (University of Montana, Missula, MT)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877717
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-7565C
TRN: US200608%%557
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the American Chemical Society, Central New Mexico Chapter Fall Conference held December 2, 2005 in Santa Fe, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES; DETECTION; TRAINING; BEES

Citation Formats

Rodacy, Philip John, Bender, Gary A., Henderson, Colin., Bender, Susan Fae Ann, and Bromenshenk, Jerry J. Training honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Rodacy, Philip John, Bender, Gary A., Henderson, Colin., Bender, Susan Fae Ann, & Bromenshenk, Jerry J. Training honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm.. United States.
Rodacy, Philip John, Bender, Gary A., Henderson, Colin., Bender, Susan Fae Ann, and Bromenshenk, Jerry J. Tue . "Training honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_877717,
title = {Training honeybees to detect explosives and other agents of harm.},
author = {Rodacy, Philip John and Bender, Gary A. and Henderson, Colin. and Bender, Susan Fae Ann and Bromenshenk, Jerry J.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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  • The current methods for hazardous waste site characterization are time consuming, cumbersome, and expensive. Typically, characterization requires a preliminary site assessment and subsequent sampling of potentially contaminated soils and waters. The samples are sent to laboratories for analysis using EPA-certified methods. It is often necessary to repeat the entire sampling-analysis cycle to characterize a site completely and accurately. For these reasons, new methods of site assessment and characterization are continually being researched. TWs paper describes a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method that rapidly screens soil samples from potentially hazardous waste sites. Analysis of a soil sample by FTIR takesmore » approximately 10 minutes. The method has been developed to identify and quantify explosives in the field and is directly applicable to selected volatile organics, semivolatile organics, and pesticides. The soil samples are desorbed in a CDS 122 thermal desorption unit under vacuum into a variable pathlength, long-path cell heated to 180{degrees}C. The spectral data, 128 co-added scans at I cm{sup {minus}l} resolution, are collected and stored using a Nicolet 60SX FTIR spectrometer. Classical least squares (CLS) analysis has been used to obtain quantitative results.« less
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