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Title: Sub-centimeter scale analysis of dispersion of solute transport through laboratory scale cross-bedded sandstone.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877712
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-7606C
TRN: US200608%%553
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the AGU Fall Meeting held December 5-9, 2005 in San Francisco, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; SOLUTES; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; SANDSTONES; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS

Citation Formats

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll, McKenna, Sean Andrew, and Klise, Katherine A. Sub-centimeter scale analysis of dispersion of solute transport through laboratory scale cross-bedded sandstone.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Tidwell, Vincent Carroll, McKenna, Sean Andrew, & Klise, Katherine A. Sub-centimeter scale analysis of dispersion of solute transport through laboratory scale cross-bedded sandstone.. United States.
Tidwell, Vincent Carroll, McKenna, Sean Andrew, and Klise, Katherine A. Tue . "Sub-centimeter scale analysis of dispersion of solute transport through laboratory scale cross-bedded sandstone.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_877712,
title = {Sub-centimeter scale analysis of dispersion of solute transport through laboratory scale cross-bedded sandstone.},
author = {Tidwell, Vincent Carroll and McKenna, Sean Andrew and Klise, Katherine A.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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  • Abstract not provided.
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