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Title: Transport processes in porous media

Abstract

Theoretical and computational research results on several aspects of porous media transport are reviewed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
City University of New York
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
877708
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/14327-1
TRN: US200712%%268
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-93ER14327
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; AQUIFERS; HYDROCARBONS; TRANSPORT; porous media, fractures, passive tracer, filtration, dispersion, Darcy's law, fracture, self-affinity, non-Newtonian fluid

Citation Formats

Joel Koplik. Transport processes in porous media. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/877708.
Joel Koplik. Transport processes in porous media. United States. doi:10.2172/877708.
Joel Koplik. Wed . "Transport processes in porous media". United States. doi:10.2172/877708. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/877708.
@article{osti_877708,
title = {Transport processes in porous media},
author = {Joel Koplik},
abstractNote = {Theoretical and computational research results on several aspects of porous media transport are reviewed.},
doi = {10.2172/877708},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 22 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 22 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The development of accurate mathematical models to predict field-scale solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones is hampered by the lack of reliable data on field-scale transport parameters. A critical review of the available literature on studies conducted at 55 saturated zone and 28 unsaturated zone sites produced 99 and 8 longitudinal dispersivity values, respectively. In the saturated zone, the scale of observation for all the data ranged from 0.75 m to 100 km with longitudinal dispersivities from 0.01 to 5500 m. However, only five sites produced highly reliable dispersivity data, based on an evaluation of the test configuration,more » the tracer monitoring, and the data analysis method for each site. The largest scale of high reliability dispersivities was only 115 m. The high reliability data subset indicates that the dispersivity initially increases with the scale of observation. But it is not clear whether the dispersivity increases indefinitely with scale or reaches an asymptotic value as is assumed in classical modelling and predicted by recent stochastic theories. In the unsaturated zone the dispersivity ranged from 1 mm to 0.7 m and appeared to increase with the scale of observation from 1 m to 20 m; however, most experiments were at scales of about 2 m. The transport process is dominated by the lateral movement of solutes in dry, high tension soils whereas in nearly saturated soils the solutes and water can move rapidly downward through the macrostructures. There is a clear need to conduct controlled large-scale field experiments in both the saturated and unsaturated zones to obtain reliable dispersivities at increasing scales and to identify the controlling transport mechanisms.« less
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  • The magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) work at Montana State University has extended the imaging of a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor to correlate T2 magnetic relaxation maps displaying biofilm structure with the corresponding velocity patterns in three dimensions in a Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm fouled square capillary. A square duct geometry is chosen to provide correlation with existing experiments and simulations, as research bioreactors tend to be of square or rectangular cross section for optical or microelectrode access. The spatially resolved velocity data provide details on the impact of biofilm induced advection on mass transport from the bulkmore » fluid to the biofilm and through the capillary bioreactor.« less