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Title: Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring

Abstract

Synchrotron light absorbers intercept synchrotron radiation to protect chamber walls from excessive heat. When subjected to the high temperature of the beam, these absorbers undergo thermal stress. If the stress is too great or fatigues the material, the absorbers may fail. These absorbers are designed to last the lifetime of the machine. Any premature cracking could result in a leak and, consequently, loss of the ultra high vacuum environment. Using secondary and backscattered electron techniques, several sections of a used copper absorber were analyzed for material damage. Chemical analyses were performed on these samples as well. Comparing the unexposed sections to the sections exposed to the electron beam, few cracks were seen in the copper. However, the exposed samples showed heavy surface damage, in addition to crevices that could eventually result in material failure. Significant corrosion was also evident along the water cooling passage of the samples. These findings suggest that further investigation and periodic inspection of absorbers in SPEAR3 are necessary to control corrosion of the copper.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877470
Report Number(s):
SLAC-TN-05-073
TRN: US0601494
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; COPPER; CORROSION; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; LIFETIME; POSITRONS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; SYNCHROTRONS; WATER; Accelerators,OTHER

Citation Formats

Marshall, S.R., /F.W. Olin Eng. Coll., Scott, B., and /SLAC. Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/877470.
Marshall, S.R., /F.W. Olin Eng. Coll., Scott, B., & /SLAC. Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring. United States. doi:10.2172/877470.
Marshall, S.R., /F.W. Olin Eng. Coll., Scott, B., and /SLAC. Thu . "Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring". United States. doi:10.2172/877470. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/877470.
@article{osti_877470,
title = {Analysis of Old Copper Synchrotron Light Absorbers from the Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring},
author = {Marshall, S.R. and /F.W. Olin Eng. Coll. and Scott, B. and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {Synchrotron light absorbers intercept synchrotron radiation to protect chamber walls from excessive heat. When subjected to the high temperature of the beam, these absorbers undergo thermal stress. If the stress is too great or fatigues the material, the absorbers may fail. These absorbers are designed to last the lifetime of the machine. Any premature cracking could result in a leak and, consequently, loss of the ultra high vacuum environment. Using secondary and backscattered electron techniques, several sections of a used copper absorber were analyzed for material damage. Chemical analyses were performed on these samples as well. Comparing the unexposed sections to the sections exposed to the electron beam, few cracks were seen in the copper. However, the exposed samples showed heavy surface damage, in addition to crevices that could eventually result in material failure. Significant corrosion was also evident along the water cooling passage of the samples. These findings suggest that further investigation and periodic inspection of absorbers in SPEAR3 are necessary to control corrosion of the copper.},
doi = {10.2172/877470},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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