skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Towards the chiral limit in QCD

Abstract

Computing hadronic observables by solving QCD from first principles with realistic quark masses is an important challenge in fundamental nuclear and particle physics research. Although lattice QCD provides a rigorous framework for such calculations many difficulties arise. Firstly, there are no good algorithms to solve lattice QCD with realistically light quark masses. Secondly, due to critical slowing down, Monte Carlo algorithms are able to access only small lattice sizes on coarse lattices. Finally, due to sign problems it is almost impossible to study the physics of finite baryon density. Lattice QCD contains roughly three mass scales: the cutoff (or inverse lattice spacing) a{sup -1}, the confinement scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, and the pion mass m{sub {pi}}. Most conventional Monte Carlo algorithms for QCD become inefficient in two regimes: when {Lambda}{sub QCD} becomes small compared to a{sup -1} and when m{sub {pi}} becomes small compared to {Lambda}{sub QCD}. The former can be largely controlled by perturbation theory thanks to asymptotic freedom. The latter is more difficult since chiral extrapolations are typically non-analytic and can be unreliable if the calculations are not done at sufficiently small quark masses. For this reason it has been difficult to compute quantities close to the chiral limit.more » The essential goal behind this proposal was to develop a new approach towards understanding QCD and QCD-like theories with sufficiently light quarks. The proposal was based on a novel cluster algorithm discovered in the strong coupling limit with staggered fermions [1]. This algorithm allowed us to explore the physics of exactly massless quarks and as well as light quarks. Thus, the hope was that this discovery would lead to the complete solution of at least a few strongly coupled QCD-like theories. The solution would be far better than those achievable through conventional methods and thus would be able to shed light on the chiral physics from a new direction. By the end of the funding period, the project led to 6 publications, one in physical review letters, three in physical review as rapid communications and two conference proceedings. A long and detailed publication on the phase diagram of two-color QCD was just submitted to hep-lat archive. All the publications are listed in the sections titled Papers published or submitted and Published conference proceedings. Based on the projects completed, it is clear that the goal of the proposal was indeed partially realized.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Duke University, Durham, NC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877383
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/41241-f
TRN: US0702476
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-03ER41241
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALGORITHMS; BARYONS; COMMUNICATIONS; CONFINEMENT; FERMIONS; PERTURBATION THEORY; PHASE DIAGRAMS; PHYSICS; PIONS; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; QUARKS; SLOWING-DOWN

Citation Formats

Shailesh Chandrasekharan. Towards the chiral limit in QCD. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/877383.
Shailesh Chandrasekharan. Towards the chiral limit in QCD. United States. doi:10.2172/877383.
Shailesh Chandrasekharan. Tue . "Towards the chiral limit in QCD". United States. doi:10.2172/877383. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/877383.
@article{osti_877383,
title = {Towards the chiral limit in QCD},
author = {Shailesh Chandrasekharan},
abstractNote = {Computing hadronic observables by solving QCD from first principles with realistic quark masses is an important challenge in fundamental nuclear and particle physics research. Although lattice QCD provides a rigorous framework for such calculations many difficulties arise. Firstly, there are no good algorithms to solve lattice QCD with realistically light quark masses. Secondly, due to critical slowing down, Monte Carlo algorithms are able to access only small lattice sizes on coarse lattices. Finally, due to sign problems it is almost impossible to study the physics of finite baryon density. Lattice QCD contains roughly three mass scales: the cutoff (or inverse lattice spacing) a{sup -1}, the confinement scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, and the pion mass m{sub {pi}}. Most conventional Monte Carlo algorithms for QCD become inefficient in two regimes: when {Lambda}{sub QCD} becomes small compared to a{sup -1} and when m{sub {pi}} becomes small compared to {Lambda}{sub QCD}. The former can be largely controlled by perturbation theory thanks to asymptotic freedom. The latter is more difficult since chiral extrapolations are typically non-analytic and can be unreliable if the calculations are not done at sufficiently small quark masses. For this reason it has been difficult to compute quantities close to the chiral limit. The essential goal behind this proposal was to develop a new approach towards understanding QCD and QCD-like theories with sufficiently light quarks. The proposal was based on a novel cluster algorithm discovered in the strong coupling limit with staggered fermions [1]. This algorithm allowed us to explore the physics of exactly massless quarks and as well as light quarks. Thus, the hope was that this discovery would lead to the complete solution of at least a few strongly coupled QCD-like theories. The solution would be far better than those achievable through conventional methods and thus would be able to shed light on the chiral physics from a new direction. By the end of the funding period, the project led to 6 publications, one in physical review letters, three in physical review as rapid communications and two conference proceedings. A long and detailed publication on the phase diagram of two-color QCD was just submitted to hep-lat archive. All the publications are listed in the sections titled Papers published or submitted and Published conference proceedings. Based on the projects completed, it is clear that the goal of the proposal was indeed partially realized.},
doi = {10.2172/877383},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The domain wall between coexisting chirally symmetric and broken symmetry regions is studied in a saddle point approximation to the effective three-flavor sigma model. In the chiral limit the surface tension varies in the range ((40 to -50)MeV)(exp 3). The width of the domain wall is estimated to be approximately or equal to 4.5 fm.
  • We report preliminary results on the chiral and deconfinement aspects of the QCD transition at finite temperature using the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action on lattices with temporal extent of N{sub {tau}} = 6 and 8. The chiral aspects of the transition are studied in terms of quark condensates and the disconnected chiral susceptibility. We study the deconfinement transition in terms of the strange quark number susceptibility and the renormalized Polyakov loop. We made continuum estimates for some quantities and find reasonably good agreement between our results and the recent continuum extrapolated results obtained with the stout staggered quarkmore » action.« less
  • We study the transition from perturbative QCD to Chiral Dynamics (linear {sigma} model), which describe physics between M{sub W} and {mu}, and between {mu} and M{sub {pi}}, respectively. This is done within the context of K decays. The smoothness of the transition is shown by comparing the explicit form of the anomalous dimension matrices in both pictures and by checking the approximate cancellation of the {mu} dependence. 6 refs., 2 figs.
  • This lecture is composed of three parts. (1) Heavy quark and gluon contents of light hadrons, (II) anomalous gluon content of the nucleon, and (III) hot and dense QCD. Non-valence structures of nucleon due to the OZI violation are extensively discussed in (I) and (II), and non-perturbative aspects of the quark-gluon plasma are reviewed in (III). 41 refs.