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Title: Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster

Abstract

We present Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the nucleus of NGC1275, the central, dominant galaxy in the Perseus cluster of galaxies. These are the first observations to resolve the linearly polarized emission from 3C84, and from them we determine a Faraday rotation measure (RM) ranging from 6500 to 7500 rad m{sup -2} across the tip of the bright southern jet component. At 22 GHz some polarization is also detected from the central parsec of 3C84, indicating the presence of even more extreme RMs that depolarize the core at lower frequencies. The nature of the Faraday screen is most consistent with being produced by magnetic fields associated with the optical filaments of ionized gas in the Perseus Cluster.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877202
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-11745
astro-ph/0602622; TRN: US200608%%126
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FARADAY EFFECT; GALAXIES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; POLARIZATION; SCREENS; Astrophysics,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Taylor, G.B., Gugliucci, N.E., Fabian, A.C., Sanders, J.S., Gentile, Gianfranco, Allen, S.W., and /New Mexico U. /NRAO, Socorro /Virginia U., Astron. Dept. /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/877202.
Taylor, G.B., Gugliucci, N.E., Fabian, A.C., Sanders, J.S., Gentile, Gianfranco, Allen, S.W., & /New Mexico U. /NRAO, Socorro /Virginia U., Astron. Dept. /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster. United States. doi:10.2172/877202.
Taylor, G.B., Gugliucci, N.E., Fabian, A.C., Sanders, J.S., Gentile, Gianfranco, Allen, S.W., and /New Mexico U. /NRAO, Socorro /Virginia U., Astron. Dept. /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park. Fri . "Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster". United States. doi:10.2172/877202. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/877202.
@article{osti_877202,
title = {Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster},
author = {Taylor, G.B. and Gugliucci, N.E. and Fabian, A.C. and Sanders, J.S. and Gentile, Gianfranco and Allen, S.W. and /New Mexico U. /NRAO, Socorro /Virginia U., Astron. Dept. /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park},
abstractNote = {We present Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the nucleus of NGC1275, the central, dominant galaxy in the Perseus cluster of galaxies. These are the first observations to resolve the linearly polarized emission from 3C84, and from them we determine a Faraday rotation measure (RM) ranging from 6500 to 7500 rad m{sup -2} across the tip of the bright southern jet component. At 22 GHz some polarization is also detected from the central parsec of 3C84, indicating the presence of even more extreme RMs that depolarize the core at lower frequencies. The nature of the Faraday screen is most consistent with being produced by magnetic fields associated with the optical filaments of ionized gas in the Perseus Cluster.},
doi = {10.2172/877202},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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