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Title: Cell Adhesion of Shewanella Oneidensis to Iron Oxide Minerals: Effect of Different Single Crystal Faces

Abstract

The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001) face of hematite, and the (100) and (111) faces of magnetite. A role for electrostatic interactions is apparent. The trend in relative forces of adhesion generated at the mineral surfaces is in agreement with predicted ferric site densities published previously. These results suggest that near-surface structure does indeed influence initial cell attachment to iron oxide surfaces; whether this is mediated via specific cell surface-mineral surface interactions or by more general interfacial phenomena remains untested.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
877007
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-48144
KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geochemical Transactions, 6(4):77-84; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Neal, Andrew L., Bank, Tracy L., Hochella, Michael F., and Rosso, Kevin M.. Cell Adhesion of Shewanella Oneidensis to Iron Oxide Minerals: Effect of Different Single Crystal Faces. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2151110.
Neal, Andrew L., Bank, Tracy L., Hochella, Michael F., & Rosso, Kevin M.. Cell Adhesion of Shewanella Oneidensis to Iron Oxide Minerals: Effect of Different Single Crystal Faces. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2151110.
Neal, Andrew L., Bank, Tracy L., Hochella, Michael F., and Rosso, Kevin M.. Fri . "Cell Adhesion of Shewanella Oneidensis to Iron Oxide Minerals: Effect of Different Single Crystal Faces". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2151110.
@article{osti_877007,
title = {Cell Adhesion of Shewanella Oneidensis to Iron Oxide Minerals: Effect of Different Single Crystal Faces},
author = {Neal, Andrew L. and Bank, Tracy L. and Hochella, Michael F. and Rosso, Kevin M.},
abstractNote = {The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001) face of hematite, and the (100) and (111) faces of magnetite. A role for electrostatic interactions is apparent. The trend in relative forces of adhesion generated at the mineral surfaces is in agreement with predicted ferric site densities published previously. These results suggest that near-surface structure does indeed influence initial cell attachment to iron oxide surfaces; whether this is mediated via specific cell surface-mineral surface interactions or by more general interfacial phenomena remains untested.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2151110},
journal = {Geochemical Transactions, 6(4):77-84},
number = 4,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 02 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Fri Dec 02 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond betweenmore » each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. « less
  • Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe 2O 3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO 3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10 –5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilmsmore » at S. oneidensis/α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10 –6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10 –7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10 –7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10 –6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10 –7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al 2O 3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.« less
  • Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al 2O 3 and α-Fe 2O 3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-hmore » exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the alpha-Al 2O 3 (1-102) and α-Fe 2O 3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10 –7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10 –6 to 10 –4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10 –7 to 10 –4 M). In comparison, the α-Al 2O 3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al 2O 3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al 2O 3 (1-102) and α-Fe 2O 3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al 2O 3 (1-102) and α-Fe 2O 3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10 –7 M; at 10 –5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10 –5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb L-III-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be complexed by carboxyl groups in S. oneidensis biofilms after 3-h exposure at pH 6.0 and [Me(II)] = 10 –5 M. In contrast with Burkholderia cepacia, which was used in our previous studies of monolayer biofilm-coated metal-oxide surfaces (Templeton et al., 2001), S. oneidensis MR-1 forms relatively thick biofilm coatings (6-20 μm) that are rich in reactive functional groups and are expected to dominate metal-ion adsorption. Lastly, our results show that even thick and highly reactive biofilms like S. oneidensis do not cause much change in the intrinsic chemical reactivities of the underlying metal-oxide surfaces with respect to aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) and don't block reactive sites on the metal-oxide surfaces; instead they reduce the rate of Pb(II) and Zn(II) sorption onto these surfaces.« less
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