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Title: Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses

Abstract

A novel glass-mica composite seal was developed based on a previously of ''infiltrated'' mica seals for solid oxide fuel cells. Ba-Al-Ca silicate sealing glass-mica composite seals. The seals were leak tested for short-term thermal cyfunction of glass volume fraction. Composite seals with 10 v% and 20 v% glatested under compressive stresses from 3 psi to 100 psi and voltage tests on dense 8YSZ electrolyte with the glas-mica composite seal showed very good thermal cycle stability.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
876906
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-44566
Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753; JPSODZ; AA2530000; TRN: US200608%%330
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Power Sources; Journal Volume: 152; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; ELECTROLYTES; GLASS; MICA; SILICATES; SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS; STABILITY; STRESSES; compressive seal; mica; leak test; thermal cycle; SOFC; compressive seals

Citation Formats

Chou, Y S., Stevenson, Jeffry W., and Singh, Prabhakar. Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2005.03.213.
Chou, Y S., Stevenson, Jeffry W., & Singh, Prabhakar. Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2005.03.213.
Chou, Y S., Stevenson, Jeffry W., and Singh, Prabhakar. Thu . "Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2005.03.213.
@article{osti_876906,
title = {Thermal Cycle Stability of a Novel Glass-Mica Composite Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effect of Glass Volume Fraction and Stresses},
author = {Chou, Y S. and Stevenson, Jeffry W. and Singh, Prabhakar},
abstractNote = {A novel glass-mica composite seal was developed based on a previously of ''infiltrated'' mica seals for solid oxide fuel cells. Ba-Al-Ca silicate sealing glass-mica composite seals. The seals were leak tested for short-term thermal cyfunction of glass volume fraction. Composite seals with 10 v% and 20 v% glatested under compressive stresses from 3 psi to 100 psi and voltage tests on dense 8YSZ electrolyte with the glas-mica composite seal showed very good thermal cycle stability.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jpowsour.2005.03.213},
journal = {Journal of Power Sources},
number = 1,
volume = 152,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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