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Title: Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG07-00ID13890

Abstract

The ITRC is a state-led national coalition dedicated to developing tools and strategies to overcome barriers and enable the deployment of beneficial new environmental technologies. ITRC works in partnership with federal agencies, industry, academia, and public and tribal stakeholders to develop these tools and strategies and means of disseminating the tools to state environmental regulators, and technology users

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Research Institute of the States
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
876658
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/13890-1
TRN: US200712%%44
DOE Contract Number:
FG07-00ID13890
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; REMEDIAL ACTION; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; environment, remediation, cleanup, pollution, pollutant

Citation Formats

Timothy R. Titus. Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG07-00ID13890. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/876658.
Timothy R. Titus. Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG07-00ID13890. United States. doi:10.2172/876658.
Timothy R. Titus. Tue . "Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG07-00ID13890". United States. doi:10.2172/876658. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/876658.
@article{osti_876658,
title = {Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG07-00ID13890},
author = {Timothy R. Titus},
abstractNote = {The ITRC is a state-led national coalition dedicated to developing tools and strategies to overcome barriers and enable the deployment of beneficial new environmental technologies. ITRC works in partnership with federal agencies, industry, academia, and public and tribal stakeholders to develop these tools and strategies and means of disseminating the tools to state environmental regulators, and technology users},
doi = {10.2172/876658},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy research and weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants represents a cost-effective treatment strategy that minimizes workers’ exposure to hazardous substances, does not require removal or transport of contaminants, and generally does not generate a secondary waste stream. We have investigated an in situ bioremediation approach that immobilizes radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadosemore » zones in the arid west, can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of a solid solution. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of Idaho, and University of Toronto as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project has focused on in situ microbially-catalyzed urea hydrolysis, which results in an increase in pH, carbonate alkalinity, ammonium, calcite precipitation, and co-precipitation of divalent cations. In calcite-saturated aquifers, microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. Key results of the project include: **Demonstrating the linkage between urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation in field and laboratory experiments **Observing strontium incorporation into calcite precipitate by urea hydrolyzers with higher distribution coefficient than in abiotic **Developing and applying molecular methods for characterizing microbial urease activity in groundwater including a quantitative PCR method for enumerating ureolytic bacteria **Applying the suite of developed molecular methods to assess the feasibility of the proposed bioremediation technique at a contaminated site located within the 100-N area of the Hanford, Washington site **Assessing the role of nitrification on the persistence of precipitated calcite by modifying primers for identification of the amoA gene region of various ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) for characterizing AOB in the field« less
  • 2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missionsmore » in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.« less
  • Funds were provided under the DOE University Reactor Instrumentation Program for the University of Arizona Research Reactor to update and enhance its instrumentation. During the first year of the Grant, 1990-1991, the equipment procured was to enhance the radiation protection program. Two items of equipment were purchased: a hand and foot exit monitor and a portable neutron survey meter.
  • The Council has acted on each of the grant deliverables during the funding period. The deliverables are: (1) convening the Council’s High Performance Computing Advisory Committee (HPCAC) on a bi-annual basis; (2) broadening public awareness of high performance computing (HPC) and exascale developments; (3) assessing the industrial applications of extreme computing; and (4) establishing a policy and business case for an exascale economy.
  • Research Group at Stanford University, we have investigated adsorption processes that could lead to the sequestration of Cr, Co, Sr, and U on minerals representative of the Hanford Vadose Zone sediments and precipitation processes resulting in alkali aluminate solids that form from the highly alkaline and aluminum-rich leachates reacting with these sediments. These elements are among the most important pollutants of concern to the Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The aqueous solutions used in these experiments were simplified surrogates of Tank leachates (i.e., they contained high Na and Al and had pH values of 10-12more » in many cases). We have examined the following processes that could lead to sequestration of these pollutant elements: (1) the sorption/coprecipitation of these elements in solids formed from reaction of alkaline aluminate solutions with simple systems of minerals representative of those found in the soils and sediments underlying the Hanford Tank Farm (e.g., quartz, feldspars, clay minerals, iron oxides); (2) the sorption/coprecipitation of these elements in solids formed from reaction of alkaline aluminate solutions with soil and sediment samples obtained from the Hanford site; and (3) the effect of aging on the stability of sorption complexes on Al-oxide and Al-oxyhydroxide surfaces formed from neutralization and homogeneous nucleation of alkaline aluminate solutions. Our investigations have utilized X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, electron and X-ray microprobe analyses, X-ray diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry analysis, as described below.« less