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Title: Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Abstract

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths.more » Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Ohio State University Research Foundation
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
876652
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-03NT41903
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CAPACITY; CARBON; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; COMBUSTION; DISTRIBUTION; ENCAPSULATION; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; FORESTS; GRAMINEAE; NITROGEN; PROGRESS REPORT; SOILS

Citation Formats

M.K. Shukla, K. Lorenz, and R. Lal. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/876652.
M.K. Shukla, K. Lorenz, & R. Lal. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio. United States. doi:10.2172/876652.
M.K. Shukla, K. Lorenz, and R. Lal. Sun . "Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio". United States. doi:10.2172/876652. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/876652.
@article{osti_876652,
title = {Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio},
author = {M.K. Shukla and K. Lorenz and R. Lal},
abstractNote = {Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.},
doi = {10.2172/876652},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils (RMS). Experimental sites characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil were identified. These sites are owned by Americal Electrical Power and are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. The sites chosen were: (1) reclaimed without topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover), (2) reclaimed with topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover) and (3) unmined sites (one under forest and another grass cover). Soil samples were collected from 0more » to 15 cm and 15 to 30 cm depths from each of the experimental site under continuous grass and SOC and, total nitrogen (TN) concentration, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were determined. The results of the study for the quarter (30 September to 31 December, 2003) showed that soil pH was > 5.5 and EC < 4 dS m{sup -1} for all sites and depths and therefore favorable for grass growth. Among the three reclamation treatments, SOC concentration increased from 1.9 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 2003 (newly reclaimed and at baseline) to 11.64 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 1987 (a 5-fold increase) to 20.41 g kg{sup -1} for sites reclaimed in 1978 (a 10- fold increase). However, for sites reclaimed without topsoil application, soil pH, EC, SOC and TN concentrations were similar for both depths. The SOC concentrations in reclaimed sites with topsoil application in 0 to 15 cm depth increased from a base value of 0.7 g kg{sup -1} at the rate of 0.76 g kg{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The high SOC concentration for 0-15 cm layer for site reclaimed in 1978 showed the high carbon sequestration potential upon reclamation and establishment of the grass cover on minesoils.« less
  • This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. During this quarter, bulk and core soil samples were collected from all 13 experimental sites for 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, and 30-50 cm depths. In addition, 54 experimental plots (4 x 4 m) were established at three separate locationsmore » on reclaimed minesites to assess the influence of compost application on SOC during project period 2. This report presents the results from two sites reclaimed during 1978. The first site is under grass and the other under forest cover. The soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were determined for these two sites on a 20 x 20 m grid. The preliminary analysis showed that the {rho}{sub b} ranged from 0.88 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.16 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 0.91 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.32 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.93 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths in Cumberland tree site, and it's statistical variability was low. The variability in {rho}{sub b} was also low in Wilds grass site and ranged from 0.82 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 1.04 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.83 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths. The {rho}{sub b} showed strong spatial dependence for 0-15 cm depth only in the Cumberland tree site. The SOC concentrations and stocks were highly variable with CV > 0.36 from all depths in both Wilds grass site and Cumberland tree site. The SOC stocks showed strong spatial dependence for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths and moderate to strong for 20-50 cm depth in the Cumberland tree site. In contrast, in Wilds grass site, {rho}{sub b} was weakly and SOC stocks moderately spatially dependent for all depths. These preliminary results suggest that the management effects are important and indicative of these sources of variability.« less
  • This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. During this quarter, water infiltration tests were performed on the soil surface in the experimental sites. Soil samples were analyzed for the soil carbon and nitrogen contents, texture, water stable aggregation, and mean weight and geometric mean diameter ofmore » aggregates. This report presents the results from two sites reclaimed during 1978 and managed under grass (Wilds) and forest (Cumberland) cover, respectively. The trees were planted in 1982 in the Cumberland site. The analyses of data on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were presented in the third quarter report. This report presents the data on infiltration rates, volume of transport and storage pores, available water capacity (AWC) of soil, particle size distribution, and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and coal carbon contents. The SIC content ranged from 0.04 to 1.68% in Cumberland tree site and 0.01 to 0.65% in the Wilds. The coal content assumed to be the carbon content after oven drying the sample at 350 C varied between 0.04 and 3.18% for Cumberland and 0.06 and 3.49% for Wilds. The sand, silt and clay contents showed moderate to low variability (CV < 0.16) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The volume of transmission (VTP) and storage pores (VSP) also showed moderate to high variability (CV ranged from 0.22 to 0.39 for Wilds and 0.17 to 0.36 for Cumberland). The CV for SIC was high (0.7) in Cumberland whereas that for coal content was high (0.4) in the Wilds. The steady state infiltration rates (i{sub c}) also showed high variability (CV > 0.6) and ranged from 0.01 to 0.98 cm min{sup -1} in Cumberland and 0.1 to 1.68 cm min{sup -1} in Wilds. The cumulative infiltration (I) was highly variable (CV > 0.6) and ranged from 4.2 to 110 cm in Cumberland and 17.4 to 250 cm in Wilds. The AWC for 0-15 cm depth also showed moderate variability (CV = 0.3) for Cumberland but high for Wilds (CV = 0.4). The sand and silt contents showed strong spatial dependence with nugget-sill ratio of 15 and 23%, respectively with a range of 50 m in Cumberland site. Strong spatial dependence for sand content was also obtained for Wilds. The VSP, AWC, I, clay content, VTP, and i{sub c}, showed moderate to low spatial dependence (nugget-sill ratio varied from 32 to 72% in Cumberland and 37 to 88% in Wilds). These preliminary results along with those reported earlier during the third quarter suggest that the management effects are important and indicative of these sources of variability.« less
  • Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOM in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed inmore » 2003 (R03-G), in 1973 (R73-F), in 1969 (R69-G), in 1962 (R62-G and R62-F) and in 1957 (R57-F). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three landscape positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The samples were air dried and using wet sieving technique were fractionated into macro (> 2mm), meso (2-0.25 mm) and microaggregate (0.25-0.053 mm). These fractions were weighted separately and water stable aggregation (WSA) and geometric mean (GMD) and mean weight (MWD) diameters of aggregates were obtained. The soil C and N concentrations were also determined on these aggregate fractions. Analysis of mean values showed that in general, WSA and MWD of aggregates increased with increasing duration since reclamation or age of reclaimed soil for all three landscape positions and two depths in sites under continuous grass. The forest sites were relatively older than grass sites and therefore WSA or MWD of aggregates did not show any increases with age since reclamation. The lower WSA in R57-F site than R73-F clearly showed the effect of soil erosion on aggregate stability. Higher aggregation and aggregate diameters in R73-F than R62-F and R57-F also showed the importance of reclamation with topsoil application on improving soil structure. Soil C and N concentrations were lowest for the site reclaimed in year 2003 in each aggregate fraction for both depths. The higher C and N concentrations each aggregate size fraction in older sites than the newly reclaimed site demonstrated the sequestration potential of younger sites.« less