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Title: RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

Abstract

A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
876421
Report Number(s):
DOE-0312-FP Rev 0
TRN: US0601188
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WASTE MANAGEMENT 2006 CONFERENCE 02/26/2006 THRU 03/02/2006 TUCSON, AZ
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; HANFORD RESERVATION; SURPLUS NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DECONTAMINATION; DEMOLITION

Citation Formats

BAZZELL, K.D., and SMITH, B.A.. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
BAZZELL, K.D., & SMITH, B.A.. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP. United States.
BAZZELL, K.D., and SMITH, B.A.. Thu . "RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/876421.
@article{osti_876421,
title = {RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP},
author = {BAZZELL, K.D. and SMITH, B.A.},
abstractNote = {A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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  • In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanfordmore » river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State was established during World War II to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons as part of the top-secret Manhattan Project. In 1989, Hanford's mission changed to cleanup and closure; today the site is engaged in one of the world's largest and most aggressive programs to clean up radioactive and hazardous wastes. The size and complexity of Hanford's environmental problems are made even more challenging by the overlapping technical, political, regulatory, financial and cultural issues associated with the cleanup. The physical challenges at the Hanford Site are daunting. More thanmore » 50 million gallons of liquid radioactive waste in 177 underground storage tanks; 2,300 tons of spent nuclear fuel;12 tons of plutonium in various forms; 25 million cubic feet of buried or stored solid waste; 270 billion gallons of groundwater contaminated above drinking-water standards spread out over about 80 square miles; more than 1,700 waste sites; and approximately 500 contaminated facilities. With a workforce of approximately 7,000 and a budget of about $1.8 billion dollars this fiscal year, Hanford cleanup operations are expected to be complete by 2035, at a cost of $60 billion dollars. (authors)« less
  • This paper describes the development of a Waste Information Management System (WMIS) to support the waste designation, transportation, and disposal processes used by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC to support cleanup of the Columbia River Corridor. This waste, primarily consisting of remediated burial sites and building demolition debris, is disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), which is located in the center of the Hanford Site (an approximately 1460 square kilometers site). WMIS uses a combination of bar-code scanning, hand-held computers, and strategic employment of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag system to track each waste shipment from waste generationmore » to disposal. (authors)« less
  • A major challenge in the River Corridor Closure Contract is establishing final cleanup decisions for the source operable units in the Hanford Site river corridor. Cleanup actions in the river corridor began in 1994 and have been performed in accordance with a 'bias for action' approach adopted by the Tri-Parties - the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology. This approach enabled early application of cleanup dollars on actual remediation of contaminated waste sites. Consequently, the regulatory framework authorizing cleanup actions at source operable units in the river corridor consists largely of interimmore » action records of decision, which were supported by qualitative risk assessments. Obtaining final cleanup decisions for the source operable units is necessary to determine whether past cleanup actions in the river corridor are protective of human health and the environment and to identify any course corrections that may be needed to ensure that ongoing and future cleanup actions are protective. Because the cleanup actions are ongoing, it is desirable to establish the final cleanup decisions as early as possible to minimize the impacts of any identified course corrections to the present cleanup approach. Development of a strategy to obtain final cleanup decisions for the source operable units in a manner that is responsive to desires for an integrated approach with the groundwater and Columbia River components while maintaining the ability to evaluate each component on its own merit represents a significant challenge. There are many different options for grouping final cleanup decisions, and each involved party or stakeholder brings slightly different interests that shape the approach. Regardless of the selected approach, there are several specific challenges and issues to be addressed before making final cleanup decisions. A multi-agency and contractor working group has been established to address these issues and develop an endorsed strategy. Ultimately, it is anticipated that the Tri-Parties will establish a set of milestones to document pathway selection and define schedule requirements. (authors)« less
  • The Pacific Northwest Laboratory operates two hot cell facilities in Hanford's 300 Area. The Post-irradiation Testing Laboratory and the Shielded Materials Facility are used for the examination and processing of irradiated fuels and materials. Major upgrades have been performed on these facilities to improve cost competitiveness, increase operational safety margins, and improve productivity. Current activities performed include irradiated fuels and materials nondestructive and destructive examinations, irradiated materials packaging and shipping, and fabrication of test specimens from irradiated materials.